Director’s Lecture Series

Directors Lecture Series

Director’s Lecture Series

Each winter, Director William (Ned) Friedman and the Arnold Arboretum present the Director’s Lecture Series, featuring nationally recognized experts addressing an array of topics related to Earth’s biodiversity and evolutionary history, the environment, conservation biology, and key social issues associated with current science. The Director’s Lecture Series is open to current Arnold Arboretum members only; visit our membership page for information on becoming a member. Lectures take place in the Hunnewell Building Lecture Hall. Parking will be available along the Arborway and in front of the Hunnewell Building on lecture nights.

Visit Past DLS Series to see descriptions and listen to audio (when available) of past lectures.

2016-17 Series: October 4, 2016, March 6, and March 20, 2017

Members only. Free, but registration required. Space is limited.

Responses to Anthropogenic Climate Change: Predicting the Future Requires Knowing the Past

Camille Parmesan with Net

Camille Parmesan, PhD, Professor, Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, and Chair in the Public Understanding of Oceans and Human Health, National Marine Aquarium, University of Plymouth, UK
Tuesday, October 4, 7:00–8:30pm, Hunnewell Building

Camille Parmesan’s work focuses on the impacts of climate change on wildlife, from field studies of American and European butterflies to synthetic analyses of global impacts on a broad range of species on land and in the oceans. She has participated in US and international assessments of climate change impacts and provided formal testimonies for the US House Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, and the Texas Senate Natural Resources Committee. Camille has served as a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which in 2007 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Naomi Oreskes

Naomi Oreskes

Naomi Oreskes, PhD, History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University
Monday, March 6, 7:00–8:30pm, Hunnewell Building
Register »

Naomi Oreskes’ research focuses on the earth and environmental sciences, with a particular interest in understanding scientific consensus and dissent. Her 2004 essay “The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change” (Science 306: 1686) has been widely cited, both in the United States and abroad, including in the Royal Society’s publication, “A Guide to Facts and Fictions about Climate Change,” in the Academy-award winning film, An Inconvenient Truth, and in Ian McEwan’s novel, Solar. Her 2010 book, Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco to Global Warming, co-authored with Erik M. Conway, received the 2011 Watson-Davis Prize from the History of Science Society. Register »

Richard Holmes

Richard Holmes

Richard Holmes, OBE, FRSL, FBA, Former Professor of Biographical Studies, University of East Anglia, UK
Monday, March 20, 7:00–8:30pm, Hunnewell Building
Register »

Richard Holmes is an award-winning British author best-known for his biographical studies of major figures of British and French Romanticism. Recent books include Falling Upwards, How We Took to the Air: An Unconventional History of Ballooning, and The Age of Wonder, both winners of the Royal Society Prize for Science Books. Holmes’ other books include Footsteps, Sidetracks, Shelley: The Pursuit, Coleridge: Early Visions, Coleridge: Darker Reflections, and Dr. Johnson & Mr. Savage. He was awarded the OBE in 1992, and is also a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and of the British Academy. His new book, This Long Pursuit, is a confessional chronicle and pilgrimage that takes him across three centuries, through much of Europe and into both his intellectual passions as well as the lively company of many earlier biographers. Central to his book is a powerful evocation of the lives of women—both scientific and literary.  Register »