Flow Through Flowed

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
September 25, 2018

Flow Through Flowed

On Saturday evening, September 22, the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University hosted Kadence Ensemble, conducted by Maria Finkelmeier, playing her composition Flow Through in the fog on the Hunnewell Building lawn. A collection of musicians from Boston and beyond, Kadence Ensemble gathered in the Hunnewell Lecture Hall for a first group rehearsal on Saturday afternoon. […]

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Tree Mob™! Aronia Hybrids…The Next Novelty Fruit?

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
May 16, 2017

Tree Mob™! Aronia Hybrids…The Next Novelty Fruit?

Interest in Aronia (chokeberry) has increased in recent years because its fruit contains high levels of antioxidants and polyphenols, it is adaptable to various geographic regions, and it has little susceptibility to diseases and pests. It seems like a great match for commercial orchard production, but currently there is little genetic diversity in Aronia grown […]

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Tree Mob™! Arbor Day Planting

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
April 24, 2017

Tree Mob™! Arbor Day Planting

Magnolia acuminata D Schissler

The Arnold Arboretum’s Campaign for the Living Collections sets forth an ambitious ten-year plan to expand the breadth of plant holdings and increase their scientific and horticultural value. Magnolia acuminata (Acc# 334-2011*A), one of the roughly 400 taxa targeted for addition to the collections in this campaign, is native to eastern North America. Grown in […]

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Botany Blast: A Look at Plant Development

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
April 17, 2017

Botany Blast: A Look at Plant Development

Winter Hazel (Corylopsis glandulifera)

Botany Blast: A Look at Plant Development William (Ned) Friedman, PhD, Director of the Arnold Arboretum and Arnold Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University 1 Session: Sunday, May 7, 1:00–2:00pm Location: Hunnewell Building Have you ever wondered why some plants have flowers before they have leaves, while others leaf out before they flower? […]

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Conifer Pollination: Sex among Evergreens

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
April 14, 2017

Conifer Pollination: Sex among Evergreens

Picea jezoensis 502-77-B

Conifer Pollination: Sex among Evergreens Andrew Leslie, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University 1 Session: Wednesday, May 3, 6:30–8:00pm Location: Weld Hill Building Cones scattered on the ground beneath an evergreen; hemlock seedlings sprouting through duff…it is easy to find evidence that conifers reproduce. But how do they do it? Andrew […]

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Witness Tree: A Year in the Forest

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
April 14, 2017

Witness Tree: A Year in the Forest

Witness Tree book jacket

Lynda Mapes, 2014-2015 Bullard Fellow in Forest Research, Harvard Forest, and Staff Reporter, The Seattle Times 1 Session: Friday, May 5, 6:00pm Reception, Reading, Signing Location: Hunnewell Building Ever wonder about the inside of a tree or how a tree functions? Or, what a single tree can tell us about climate? Reporter Lynda Mapes spent […]

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Tree Mob™! To See or Not to See

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
April 7, 2017

Tree Mob™! To See or Not to See

The Forest Unseen cropped

North Woods Dell

“…the truth of the forest may be more clearly and vividly revealed by the contemplation of a small area than it could by donning ten-league boots, covering a continent but uncovering little.”

David George Haskell, The Forest Unseen.

 

We see a lot in our hectic days, but how much of that do we truly perceive? If we paused for a bit each day in the same spot, what might we learn…about our surroundings, ourselves, other beings? Biologist David George Haskell wondered just that and then followed through on his question. He visited a small plot in a forest, almost daily for a year. What he discovered during an annual cycle of seasons should be incentive for us all to choose to see.

David George Haskell spoke in the North Woods about his year of observations and how anyone could hone their ecological understanding. The group gathered at Acc. # 11472*A, Acer truncatum (purpleblow maple), at 5:30pm on Tuesday, April 11, 2017.

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Tree Mob™! Worms–the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
March 24, 2017

Tree Mob™! Worms–the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Brendan's Worms

March 29, 4:00pm, Hunnewell Building What’s good for the garden isn’t necessarily good for the forest. Earthworms, for example, make nutrients accessible to annual and perennial plants in a garden, but disturb nutrient cycling in New England’s forest ecosystems. Most earthworms in New England are exotic, with some considered invasive. Some, like the crazy snake […]

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The New American Chestnut

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
March 23, 2017

The New American Chestnut

William Powell at Chestnut

William A. Powell, MD, PhD, Director, Council on Biotechnology in Forestry, SUNY, Environmental Science and Forestry and Co-Director, New York State American Chestnut Research and Restoration Program 1 Session: Monday, April 17, 7:00–8:30pm Location: Hunnewell Building Much work has gone into attempting to bring back the American chestnut (Castanea dentata), decimated by the exotic chestnut […]

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Seed: The Untold Story

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
March 23, 2017