Tree Mob™! Aronia Hybrids…The Next Novelty Fruit?

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
May 16, 2017

Tree Mob™! Aronia Hybrids…The Next Novelty Fruit?

Interest in Aronia (chokeberry) has increased in recent years because its fruit contains high levels of antioxidants and polyphenols, it is adaptable to various geographic regions, and it has little susceptibility to diseases and pests. It seems like a great match for commercial orchard production, but currently there is little genetic diversity in Aronia grown […]

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Tree Mob™! Arbor Day Planting

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
April 24, 2017

Tree Mob™! Arbor Day Planting

Magnolia acuminata D Schissler

The Arnold Arboretum’s Campaign for the Living Collections sets forth an ambitious ten-year plan to expand the breadth of plant holdings and increase their scientific and horticultural value. Magnolia acuminata (Acc# 334-2011*A), one of the roughly 400 taxa targeted for addition to the collections in this campaign, is native to eastern North America. Grown in […]

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Tree Mob™! To See or Not to See

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
April 7, 2017

Tree Mob™! To See or Not to See

The Forest Unseen cropped

North Woods Dell

“…the truth of the forest may be more clearly and vividly revealed by the contemplation of a small area than it could by donning ten-league boots, covering a continent but uncovering little.”

David George Haskell, The Forest Unseen.

 

We see a lot in our hectic days, but how much of that do we truly perceive? If we paused for a bit each day in the same spot, what might we learn…about our surroundings, ourselves, other beings? Biologist David George Haskell wondered just that and then followed through on his question. He visited a small plot in a forest, almost daily for a year. What he discovered during an annual cycle of seasons should be incentive for us all to choose to see.

David George Haskell spoke in the North Woods about his year of observations and how anyone could hone their ecological understanding. The group gathered at Acc. # 11472*A, Acer truncatum (purpleblow maple), at 5:30pm on Tuesday, April 11, 2017.

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Tree Mob™! Worms–the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
March 24, 2017

Tree Mob™! Worms–the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Brendan's Worms

March 29, 4:00pm, Hunnewell Building What’s good for the garden isn’t necessarily good for the forest. Earthworms, for example, make nutrients accessible to annual and perennial plants in a garden, but disturb nutrient cycling in New England’s forest ecosystems. Most earthworms in New England are exotic, with some considered invasive. Some, like the crazy snake […]

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Tree Mob™! Resin or Not? Plant Exudate

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
December 22, 2016

Tree Mob™! Resin or Not? Plant Exudate

Santiago-Blay Smithsonian Mag

Thursday, January 5, 3:45pm in Hunnewell Building Many plants, especially trees, ooze exudates (the gooey stuff, for example, dripping down the trunk of a white pine). Plant exudates include numerous organic products such as resins, gums, and kinos. Smithsonian paleobiologist Jorge Santiago-Blay will be collecting samples from the Arnold Arboretum to add to his project […]

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Next Tree Mob™: Bark into Golden Hickory Syrup

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
December 4, 2016

Next Tree Mob™: Bark into Golden Hickory Syrup

Hickory Syrup

For many from New England, the only syrup approved for pancakes is that which is locally-tapped from a sugar maple (Acer saccharum). However, sap isn’t the only tree source for making syrup. Arboretum horticulturist Sue Pfeiffer took advantage of a downed shagbark hickory (Carya ovata), gathered some bark, and then proceeded to bake and boil. […]

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Tree Mob™! Mechanisms of Mortality: Dwarf Mistletoe along the Maine Coast

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
November 4, 2016

Tree Mob™! Mechanisms of Mortality: Dwarf Mistletoe along the Maine Coast

Eastern dwarf mistletoe

Eastern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum), a diminutive plant parasite, can fell a mature white spruce (Picea glauca) in a matter of years. Drawing upon observations at scales from hormone metabolism through whole-tree growth, Barry Logan, a Visiting Scholar from Bowdoin College, proposes a causal chain of events leading to white spruce decline. He relates the […]

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Tree Mob™! Radishing, Simply Radishing

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
October 27, 2016

Tree Mob™! Radishing, Simply Radishing

radishes_in_walnuts

Radishing, Simply Radishing Vegetables are good for humans, but can trees benefit from them as well? This summer and fall, the Arboretum experimented with growing radishes, perhaps a first since Benjamin Bussey farmed this land in the early 1800s. Living Collections Fellow Jenna Zukswert will speak about the reasons for planting a taproot crop among […]

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Tree Mob™! A Unilateral Contract: Epifagus

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
October 12, 2016

Tree Mob™! A Unilateral Contract: Epifagus

Epifagus virginiana

A Unilateral Contract: Epifagus in the Beech Grove Walking under the beautiful American beech (Fagus grandifolia) on a gorgeous afternoon seems a lovely thing. But do you know that a sinister thief may be present? This freeloader, Epifagus virginiana or commonly beechdrop, is a parasitic plant that forms delicate connections to the roots of American […]

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Tree Mob™! Meadow Management

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
September 16, 2016

Tree Mob™! Meadow Management

Kent Field Meadow

Meadow Management Wednesday, September 28, 3:45pm Kent Field, the grassy meadow that spreads out below the Conifer Collection, provides important habitat for birds, small mammals, and pollinators. Over the past several years, the Arboretum’s horticulture crew (and even staff at an all-staff work day) has been increasing the number and variety of perennial wild flowers […]

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