Frank Meyer caravan, Chili Province near Yingtau-ko, 1913

January 14, 2016

Caravan of mules and donkeys on a pass in mountains

Frank Meyer caravan, Chili Province near Yingtau-ko, 1913

Caravan of mules and donkeys on a pass in mountains

China – Chili Province. Near Yingtau-ko, Chili Prov., China. Exploration in China. My mule and donkey caravan, with the assistant and interpreter, on top of a pass about 4,000 feet above sea level. Coming back from an investigation trip in a cherry and persimmon district. Sept. 13, 1913. [Information from label on verso of photo mount.] 10 x 12.5 cm. Emulsion on glass.

China – Chili Province near Yingtau-ko

[Title from recto of mount.]
Alternate Title: Caravan of mules and donkeys on a pass in mountains
Photograph by Frank Nicholas Meyer (1875-1918) Dutch, American
Chili Province near Yingtau-ko, China
September 13, 1913

A larger version of this image is available in Harvard University’s HOLLIS+ catalog.

Frank Nicholas Meyer (1875-1918) was born in Amsterdam, began his career at the Amsterdam Botanical Garden where he worked his way up to the position of head gardener in charge of the experimental garden. Meyer arrived in America in 1901, and obtained work with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). When his returned from a collecting trip in Mexico in 1904, David Fairchild (1869-1954) of the Foreign Plant Introduction Section of the USDA hired Meyer to make a collecting trip to China. This began a 13-year odyssey that led to the introduction of more than 2,000 species of plants. In an arrangement between Charles S. Sargent and Fairchild, Meyer sent the Arnold Arboretum trees and shrubs of ornamental value along with his photographs of plants and landscapes.

This photograph was taken during Meyer’s 1913 China trip, during which he determined that chestnut blight had indeed developed in China, but had not decimated the Asian chestnuts. The chestnut population of America had not fared so well at that time.

Copyright © 2006, President and Fellows of Harvard College, Arnold Arboretum Archives; all rights reserved.

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