Events

Upcoming Events

See all of our tour and class listings.

Viewing Events from April 25, 2019 to May 25, 2019

Around the World in 80 Trees

Around the World in 80 Trees

Jonathan Drori, Author; Trustee, The Eden Project
1 Session: Thursday, April 25, 7:00–8:15pm
Location: Weld Hill Building

Trees are one of humanity’s most constant and varied companions. From India’s sacred banyan to the fragrant cedar of Lebanon, they offer us sanctuary and inspiration – not to mention the raw materials for everything from Around the World in 80 Treesaspirin to maple syrup. In Around the World in 80 Trees, Jonathan Drori uses plant science to illuminate how trees play a role in every part of human life, from the romantic to the regrettable, to the downright ridiculous. Stops on this literary journey include the lime trees of Berlin’s Unter den Linden boulevard, which intoxicate amorous Germans and hungry bees alike, the swankiest streets in nineteenth-century London, which were paved with Australian jarrah wood, and the Japanese Lacquer tree, whose sap has been used not only for some of the world’s most beautiful man-made objects but also by a sect of monks to mummify themselves while still alive. Jonathan Drori will share some of these strange and true tales taking us on a stunning journey through this arboretum of surprising tales.

Fee Free member, $5 nonmember

Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

Tour: Calling All Birders!

Calling All Birders!

Bob Mayer, Arboretum Docent
Choose from 3 Saturdays and one Sunday, 8:00-9:30am.
This spring, join a great birder on four great walks. Catch a glimpse of migrating birds as they fly to breeding grounds. Good for all experience levels. Bring binoculars if you have them; some binoculars will be available to share. Choose one or sign up for more!

See map for Meeting Locations:
Sat. April 27: Arborway Gate
Sat. May 4: Peters Hill Gate
Sun. May 5: South Street Gate, Bussey Brook Meadow, co-sponsored by Arboretum Park Conservancy
Sat. May 18: Arborway Gate

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209.

Free, registration requested
Get to Know Your Chainsaw

Get to Know Your Chainsaw

John DelRosso, Head Arborist, Arnold Arboretum
1 Session: Saturday, April 27, 9:00am–1:00pm
Location: Dana Greenhouse Classroom

Before using a chainsaw, it is best to understand all of its parts, built in safety features, maintenance requirements, and the forces in play once you rev its small but powerful engine. If you own a saw, bring it to class. If you don’t own a saw but intend to purchase one, wait until you’ve attended the class to learn which styles and features are best for your size and needs. Participants should bring safety goggles, gloves, and ear protection. Dress for the outdoors and bring a snack and beverage. This class is designed for beginners or those who have never taken a formal class on chainsaw safety. John will instruct on the way to handle a saw safely, how best to lessen fatigue so as to avoid accidents and injuries, and how to sharpen a saw. Participants will not practice felling trees. Registrants must sign an Assumption of Risk and Release to participate.
Fee $45 member, $58 nonmember
Forest Bathing

Saturday Forest Bathing

2nd & 4th Saturdays in April and May, 9:00am-11:00am
Tam Willey, Certified Forest Therapy Guide
Location: Bussey St. Gate Entrance at map tables

Forest Bathing is inspired by Shinrin-yoku, a prominent feature of preventative medicine and healing in Japan.  From increased cerebral blood flow to stronger immune defenses, there has been extensive research demonstrating what can happen when we relax, unplug and open our senses to the natural world in community.  

This slow-paced guided therapeutic experience promotes wellness through a series of gentle sensory-opening invitations that welcome us to notice more of our natural surroundings.  By deepening our connection with the natural world and each other, we open ourselves up to the healing medicine of the forest.  Forest Bathing is part of a global effort to tend to the stressful conditions of living in modern industrialized civilization.  

Tam is a Certified Forest Therapy Guide, Training Apprentice and Mentor with the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs. Tam believes the practice of Forest Bathing can deepen and broaden our relationships. Tam’s training includes an understanding of the scientific framework of Forest Therapy as well as the cultural repair that is made possible by holding space for seekers of this medicine to share and bear witness in community as part of the natural world.  Tam created Toadstool Walks as a way to offer support in finding one’s own way towards experiencing belonging to the natural world.

For more information about Tam, check out ToadstoolWalks.com


Fee $25 member, $35 nonmember
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5209

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.304.9313

Tree Spotter Basic Training 2019

Tree Spotters Citizen Science Program: Basic Training

Suzanne Mrozak, Tree Spotter Volunteer Coordinator and Danny Schissler, Project Coordinator, Arnold Arboretum
Select a date:  March 24 10:30-12:00pm [HB], April 20, 10:30-12:00pm [WH], April 27, 10:30-12:00pm [HB], May 5, 10:30-12:00pm [HB]
Location:  March 24, April 27, May 5 Hunnewell Building Lecture Hall; April 20, Weld Hill Lecture Hall

Multiple Sessions: March 24 10:30-12:00pm [HB], April 20, 10:30-12:00pm [WH], April 27, 10:30-12:00pm [HB], May 5, 10:30-12:00pm [HB]

With nearly 4,000 different kinds of plants represented in the Arboretum's living collections, every day presents rich opportunities to see something new. If you enjoy learning about plants and their unique characteristics, you can contribute to science as a participant in our Tree Spotters program. This citizen science project opens a window into the Arboretum's phenology: the timing of natural events, such as the leafing out and flowering of trees in the spring and changing foliage colors in the fall. Your observations will assist Arboretum scientists in their studies of the effects of a changing climate on plants

Each new Tree Spotter must first attend one Basic Training class (Module 1), followed by at least one Beyond the Basics class (Module 2). Please register for both modules if you would like to participate in this program. 

The Basic Training class (Module 1) provides an introduction to citizen science, phenology, and an overview of the Tree Spotters program. Each Beyond the Basics class (Module 2) will focus on how to observe different tree and shrub species, and record and submit data. 

All Tree Spotters events are free, and all levels of experience are welcome. Visit the Tree Spotters web page to learn more about the program and see training session dates for Modules 1 and 2. 


If you have any questions, please email us at TreeSpotters@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Free but registration requested
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5209.

Guided Saturday Tour

Saturday Guided Tours

Arboretum Docents
10:30am-Noon, beginning April 13, 2019
Location: Hunnewell Building unless otherwise specified

Enjoy a free guided tour of the Arnold Arboretum landscape with a knowledgeable docent. Tours are appropriate for adults and last approximately 90 minutes. Landscape highlights, seasonal interest, history, and more. If you have a group of four or fewer persons, you are welcome to join. For a group of more than four, please request a private tour.

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209. 

These walks are free, no need to register.
Tree Spotter Beyond the Basics Training, Yellow Buckeye/River Birch (Module 2)

Tree Spotters Citizen Science Program: Beyond the Basics Training,Yellow Buckeye/River Birch

Suzanne Mrozak, Tree Spotter Volunteer Coordinator and Danny Schissler, Project Coordinator, Arnold Arboretum
April 27 1:00-3:30pm,

April 27 1:00-3:30pm

With nearly 4,000 different kinds of plants represented in the Arboretum's living collections, every day presents rich opportunities to see something new. If you enjoy learning about plants and their unique characteristics, you can contribute to science as a participant in our Tree Spotters program. This citizen science project opens a window into the Arboretum's phenology: the timing of natural events, such as the leafing out and flowering of trees in the spring and changing foliage colors in the fall. Your observations will assist Arboretum scientists in their studies of the effects of a changing climate on plants

Each new Tree Spotter must first attend one Basic Training class (Module 1), followed by at least one Beyond the Basics class (Module 2). Please register for both modules if you would like to participate in this program. 

The Basic Training class (Module 1) provides an introduction to citizen science, phenology, and an overview of the Tree Spotters program. Each Beyond the Basics class (Module 2) will focus on how to observe different tree and shrub species, and record and submit data. 

This Beyond the Basics class covers the phenology of yellow buckeye (Aesculus flava) and river birch (Betula nigra), and includes an outdoor component. Participants should be prepared to walk on the grounds for roughly one hour. For concerns about inclement weather, text or call Suzanne Mrozak at 857-321-2825.

All Tree Spotters events are free, and all levels of experience are welcome. Visit the Tree Spotters web page to learn more about the program and see training session dates for Modules 1 and 2. 


If you have any questions, please email us at TreeSpotters@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Free but registration requested
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5209.

Guided Sunday Tour

Sunday Guided Tours

Arboretum Docents
1:00pm-2:30pm, beginning April 14, 2019
Location: Hunnewell Building unless otherwise specified

Enjoy a free guided tour of the Arnold Arboretum landscape with a knowledgeable docent. Tours are appropriate for adults and last approximately 90 minutes. Landscape highlights, seasonal interest, history, and more. If you have a group of four or fewer persons, you are welcome to join. For a group of more than four, please request a private tour.

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209. 

These walks are free, no need to register.
Census Challenge! - Biodiversity Sampling

Census Challenge! - Biodiversity Sampling

Arnold Arboretum Staff and Volunteers
2:00pm-4:00pm 
Sunday, April 28 2019
Location: North Woods 

This is part of the new Science in Our Park Series. Come to the Arnold Arboretum and be a scientist! Get your hands onto scientific tools, use your observation skills and share your findings with others.

Census Challenge will test your categorizing and observational skills. Join us in the North Woods and help us catalog the diversity of living organisms found in a small area. You will be surprised!

One adult may bring a maximum of three children; suitable for children ages five and up. This is a drop in activity. The North Woods is located adjacent to Meadow Road near the Linden Path, signage will be posted to help you navigate. 

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209.

Guided Weekday Tour

Weekday Guided Tours: May, June, September, and October

Arboretum Docents
Mondays and Thursdays, 10:30am-noon

No tours Monday, May 27, Mon. Sept. 2, Mon. Oct. 7
Location: Hunnewell Building

Weekday guided tours are Mondays and Thursdays in May, June, September and October. Join one of our docents for a weekday tour from 10:30am to noon. Meet at the Hunnewell Building and enjoy a walk, learning about the highlights of Arboretum history, the collections, and seasonal interest.

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209.
These walks are free, no need to register.
Forest Bathing - 5 Week Forest Circle Series

Forest Bathing - 5 Week Forest Circle Series

Thursdays in May

May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 5:30-7:30pm
Tam Willey, Certified Forest Therapy Guide

Location: Main Entrance at Hunnewell Building

Whether you have experienced a Forest Bathing Walk before or are trying it for the first time, this is a chance to go deeper and begin to build a practice of your own.  Forest Bathing is most effective when done over time.  In this 5-week series, you will begin to truly foster an ongoing relationship with the natural world and with the support of the forest and our group, you will learn how to create your own ongoing practice of Shinrin-yoku.

Forest Bathing is inspired by Shinrin-yoku, a prominent feature of preventative medicine and healing in Japan.  From increased cerebral blood flow to stronger immune defenses, there has been extensive research demonstrating what can happen when we relax, unplug and open our senses to the natural world in community.  This practice is part of a global effort to tend to the stressful conditions of living in modern industrialized civilization.  

 


Tam is a Certified Forest Therapy Guide, Training Apprentice and Mentor with the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs. Tam believes the practice of Forest Bathing can deepen and broaden our relationships. Tam’s training includes an understanding of the scientific framework of Forest Therapy as well as the cultural repair that is made possible by holding space for seekers of this medicine to share and bear witness in community as part of the natural world.  Tam created Toadstool Walks as a way to offer support in finding one’s own way towards experiencing belonging to the natural world.

For more information about Tam, check out ToadstoolWalks.com

Fee $125 member, $175 nonmember
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5209

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.304.9313

Arboretum for Educators

Arboretum for Educators

Monthly: Select Saturdays, 9:00–11:30am
Location: Hunnewell Building

Arboretum for Educators monthly explorations are a professional development opportunity for elementary and middle school teachers to introduce the Arboretum landscape as an outdoor classroom. Participants learn about specific hands-on life science topics that may be used or adapted by teachers for their own classrooms and outdoor spaces. Meet and network with other like-minded educators, and engage in life science learning.

Free, but registration requested

View a printable 2018-2019 schedule.


Plant Selection, Planting, and Establishment

Landscape Plant Selection, Planting, and Establishment

Andrew Gapinski, Head of Horticulture, Arnold Arboretum
1 Session: Saturday, May 4, 1:00–3:30pm
Location: Hunnewell Building and Landscape

Ensuring the long-term health of your landscape starts with healthy plants from the nursery, proper site selection and preparation, and sound planting and establishment. Andrew Gapinski will discuss professional standards and techniques, along with common issues and solutions for both balled-and-burlapped and containerized specimens. He will focus on landscape trees, shrubs, and perennials – ornamental annuals and vegetables will not be covered in this offering. Class will start indoors and then move outdoors to the Dana Greenhouse Nursery.

Fee $30 member, $42 nonmember

Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

Tour: The Arboretum's First 25 Years

How the Arboretum Became the Arboretum: The First 25 Years

Emily Wheeler, Arboretum Docent

Sunday, May 5, 11:00am-12:30pm
Location: Centre Street Gate
The Arnold Arboretum did not come into existence full-formed, but had a long adolescence before it (literally) blossomed at 50. Our first director, Charles Sargent, prepared a 50-year report in 1922, before the end of his own 54-year tenure. But, what about the first 25 years? We don't have a 25-year report, however, we do have photos and the engaging stories from that time. Join our docent to hear those stories, as she takes you on a timeline through the walnut and oak collections, to the beeches, and back via Bussey Hill. This tour meets at the Centre Street Gate. In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209.

Free, registration requested.
Tree Spotter Beyond the Basics Training, Highbush Blueberry/Viburnum (Module 2)

Tree Spotters Citizen Science Program: Beyond the Basics Training, Highbush Blueberry/Viburnum

Suzanne Mrozak, Tree Spotter Volunteer Coordinator and Danny Schissler, Project Coordinator, Arnold Arboretum
May 5 1:00-3:30pm,

May 5 1:00-3:30pm

With nearly 4,000 different kinds of plants represented in the Arboretum's living collections, every day presents rich opportunities to see something new. If you enjoy learning about plants and their unique characteristics, you can contribute to science as a participant in our Tree Spotters program. This citizen science project opens a window into the Arboretum's phenology: the timing of natural events, such as the leafing out and flowering of trees in the spring and changing foliage colors in the fall. Your observations will assist Arboretum scientists in their studies of the effects of a changing climate on plants

Each new Tree Spotter must first attend one Basic Training class (Module 1), followed by at least one Beyond the Basics class (Module 2). Please register for both modules if you would like to participate in this program. 

The Basic Training class (Module 1) provides an introduction to citizen science, phenology, and an overview of the Tree Spotters program. Each Beyond the Basics class (Module 2) will focus on how to observe different tree and shrub species, and record and submit data. 

This Beyond the Basics class covers the phenology of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) and with-rod (Viburnum cassinoides), and includes an outdoor component. Participants should be prepared to walk on the grounds for roughly one hour. For concerns about inclement weather, text or call Suzanne Mrozak at 857-321-2825.

All Tree Spotters events are free, and all levels of experience are welcome. Visit the Tree Spotters web page to learn more about the program and see training session dates for Modules 1 and 2. 


If you have any questions, please email us at TreeSpotters@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Free but registration requested
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5209.

Greenhouses' tour: From Seed to Tree

From Seed to Tree

Dana Greenhouses' Staff
First Tuesday of the month, May through October, 1:00pm-1:45pm.

Did you know that almost all of the plants in the Arboretum begin their lives in the Dana Greenhouses? Get a behind-the-scenes look of the greenhouse growing process, from seed to sprout to seedling to tree. Meet at the Bonsai and Penjing Collection above the Leventritt Shrub & Vine Garden. There is a 15 person maximum. Free, registration requested and limited
Register online at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5209.
Tour: When Lilacs in the Arboretum Bloomed!

When Lilacs in the Arboretum Bloomed!

Chris McArdle, Arboretum Docent

Wednesday, May 8, 11:00am-12:30pm; Monday, May 13, 1:00pm-2:00pm
Location: Map Table at Bradley Rosaceous Collection
Come for one of these special walks in the Syringa (lilac) collection with docent Chris McArdle. Chris trained with former Head Plant Propagator and lilac expert, Jack Alexander. Within the collection itself, she will give you a thorough view into the rich history of the many varieties of this well-loved, and Arboretum-renowned plant. The Map table is by the ponds and just under a ten minute walk from the Forest Hills T station.
In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209.

Free, registration requested.
Exhibition: Drawn to Paint, Paul Olson

Drawn to Paint

Paintings of Arboretum Trees by Paul Olson

May 10 – July 21, 2019

Opening Reception, Saturday, May 18, 1:00-3:00pm

Location: Hunnewell Building

Artist, Paul Olson, has been discovering the nuances of the Arnold Arboretum's collections since he first passed through its gates in 2011. A landscape painter for decades, Olson explores the grounds with sketchbook in hand, typically in the early morning hours. His goal is to be unencumbered by any agenda and open to what the light of the day presents. In 2012, he had an exhibition at the Arnold Arboretum titled "Drawn to Woods." The expressive ink drawings in that show were all completed en plein air - on-site in the open air. In this new show, Olson brings his on-site observations into the painting studio to work in color, reflecting on his real-world experience, but searching for that delightful sense of childlike discovery found in nature. These works on paper and canvas also feature paintings of bonsai from the Bonsai and Penjing collection here at the Arboretum.
Paul Olson is an instructor at his Alma Mater, Rhode Island School of Design, and also teaches in the Illustration Department at Massachusetts College of Art. He has exhibited in various group and solo shows in the US. Olson also makes pottery for bonsai and is an avid bonsai cultivator.

Free, public invited 

The Future of Environmental Protection

2019 Directors Lecture Series

The Future of Environmental Protection

Gina McCarthy, Professor of the Practice of Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, Harvard University
1 Session: Monday, May 13, 7:00–8:15pm
Location: Weld Hill Building

Note: We've moved this program from the Hunnewell Building to the Weld Hill Building, 1300 Centre Street, Roslindale.

International cooperation on mitigating climate change has lost momentum since the US withdrew from the 2015 Paris Agreement last year. What does this mean for the health of the planet and the life it supports? Gina McCarthy has dedicated her 35-year career in public service to environmental protection and public health. In this talk, McCarthy will discuss current efforts at the federal level to rollback core public health protections and actions taken to counter climate change. She will also address recent attacks on the field of science. Then, looking forward, she will lead a discussion on future challenges in public health and the health of our planet.


Free, member-only event. Registration required

Become a member.
Lilac Therapy

Lilac Therapy Walk

Tuesday, May 14 & Thursday, May 16, 9:00am-11:00am
Tam Willey, Certified Forest Therapy Guide
Location: Map Table by the Ponds

Every May, visitors flock to the Arnold Arboretum in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts to breathe in the fragrant lilac collection and witness the array of color.  This flower has a history of medicinal use and if you have ever spent time inhaling this sweet fragrance you may have noticed a sense of calm and relaxation.  May can be a time of unwinding as we transition into a new season under a warmer and brighter sun.  Whether you've been visiting the lilac collection for years or have yet to experience them, this is an invitation to unplug, de-stress and recharge on a guided lilac therapy walk.  


This two hour therapeutic experience combines wandering, sitting, and resting.  We will cover no more than a mile, weaving through the lilacs prompted by a series of gentle sensory-opening invitations.  


Forest Bathing is inspired by Shinrin-yoku, a prominent feature of preventative medicine and healing in Japan.  From increased cerebral blood flow to stronger immune defenses, there has been extensive research demonstrating what can happen when we relax, unplug and open our senses to the natural world in community.  This practice is part of a global effort to tend to the stressful conditions of living in modern industrialized civilization.  


Experience the healing medicine of the Lilacs!

 


Tam is a Certified Forest Therapy Guide, Training Apprentice and Mentor with the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs. Tam believes the practice of Forest Bathing can deepen and broaden our relationships. Tam’s training includes an understanding of the scientific framework of Forest Therapy as well as the cultural repair that is made possible by holding space for seekers of this medicine to share and bear witness in community as part of the natural world.  Tam created Toadstool Walks as a way to offer support in finding one’s own way towards experiencing belonging to the natural world.

For more information about Tam, check out ToadstoolWalks.com

Fee $25 member, $35 nonmember
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5209

In case of inclement weather, contact 617.304.9313

How Birds Work: Eggs

How Birds Work: Eggs

Lorna Gibson, PhD, Matoula S. Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
1 Session: Tuesday, May 14, 7:00–8:00pm
Location: Hunnewell Building

How does an egg become an egg? Why do chickens continue to lay eggs day after day? What controls the shape of eggs? Why do eggs of different species of birds have different colors? And how strong are eggshells? In this talk which follows previous talks about bird flight, migration, and feathers, Lorna Gibson answers common questions about bird eggs.
Fee Free, but registration requested

Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

Smartphone Photography: Spring Close-Ups

Smartphone Photography: Spring Close-Ups

Nancy Katz, Professional Photographer
3 Wednesdays: May 15, 29, June 12, 1:30–3:30pm
Location: Hunnewell Building and Landscape

Capture the magic of the season with your smartphone. Lilacs, azaleas, horse chestnuts, redbuds, and more will be flowering and leaves will have recently unfurled, providing a perfect venue for close-up photographs.

Professional photographer Nancy Katz will teach you that you don’t need fancy equipment or lenses to come in close to shoot these exquisite plants. You need your smartphone and an understanding of shooting macro (close up) and how to enhance the images with your phone’s editing capabilities and a great App, aptly named Snapseed. Most of the time will be spent outdoors, except when working on Snapseed in small groups.  

Fee member $65, nonmember $84
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.
Exhibition: Reception, Drawn to Paint, Paul Olson

Drawn to Paint

Paintings of Arboretum Trees by Paul Olson

May 10 – July 21, 2019

Opening Reception, Saturday, May 18, 1:00-3:00pm

Location: Hunnewell Building

Artist, Paul Olson, has been discovering the nuances of the Arnold Arboretum's collections since he first passed through its gates in 2011. A landscape painter for decades, Olson explores the grounds with sketchbook in hand, typically in the early morning hours. His goal is to be unencumbered by any agenda and open to what the light of the day presents. In 2012, he had an exhibition at the Arnold Arboretum titled "Drawn to Woods." The expressive ink drawings in that show were all completed en plein air - on-site in the open air. In this new show, Olson brings his on-site observations into the painting studio to work in color, reflecting on his real-world experience, but searching for that delightful sense of childlike discovery found in nature. These works on paper and canvas also feature paintings of bonsai from the Bonsai and Penjing collection here at the Arboretum.
Paul Olson is an instructor at his Alma Mater, Rhode Island School of Design, and also teaches in the Illustration Department at Massachusetts College of Art. He has exhibited in various group and solo shows in the US. Olson also makes pottery for bonsai and is an avid bonsai cultivator.

Free, public invited 

Family Hike: Flower Power

Family Hike: Flower Power

Nancy Sableski, Manager of Children's Education
Sunday, May 19, 2:00-3:30pm
Location: Hunnewell Building

Families need nature at all times of the year! Meet inside the main gate at the Visitor Center. We’ll look at buds and blooms and learn how bees find flowers. Go on a StoryWalk®, get a bee tattoo, and look at flowers under microscopes. Free and open to all, most suitable for children ages four through ten.



In case of inclement weather, contact 617.384.5209.

Ethnobotany at Harvard

Ethnobotany at Harvard

John de la Parra, PhD, Associate, Harvard University Herbarium and Ethnobotanist
1 Session: Wednesday, May 22, 12:00–2:00pm..pm

Historically, plants have provided humans with most of our drugs, fibers, food, dyes, perfumes, building materials, and even musical instruments. But how has this diverse and fascinating field been studied and what has been learned? In fact, for over 100 years, Harvard has played a pivotal role in the study of human-plant interactions, leading to the creation of the field of ethnobotany. In this interactive lecture we will explore the science and history of some of the most important Harvard botanists and explorers through their unique specimens – now housed in the Harvard University Herbarium.

Fee $20 member, $30 nonmember

Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.