A NACPEC expedition in North America: Part 2

by Jared Rubinstein, Living Collections Fellow
September 16, 2019

Perfection in miniature

by Alvin Powell for the Harvard Gazette
July 26, 2019

Boston Ballet dances the night away

by Deborah Blackwell, Marketing & Communications Specialist
June 21, 2019

‘Pride and Prejudice’ coming to the Arnold Arboretum

by Deborah Blackwell, Marketing & Communications Specialist
May 13, 2019

Arboretum announces 2019 research awardees

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
April 16, 2019

Arboretum announces 2019 research awardees

research awards 2019

Each spring the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University offers a research fellowship and a number of awards to support independent research projects submitted by students, post-doctoral researchers, and biological and horticultural science professionals. Stemming from the Arboretum’s mission to support and facilitate scientific inquiry and knowledge sharing about the plant kingdom, these opportunities enable researchers […]

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Swallows, springtime, and “Carol of the Bells”

by Brendan Keegan, Landscape Crew Gardener
April 12, 2019

Swallows, springtime, and “Carol of the Bells”

Visitors on the grounds may have noticed small numbers of migrant male tree swallows, recently returned from Central America, circling above the Arboretum landscape. Watching them gracefully swoop above the meadows, it is easy to understand why swallow species as a whole are beloved signs of the spring around the world. Ukrainians, for example, celebrate […]

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Remembering George Putnam

by Bryan Marquard for The Boston Globe
April 4, 2019

Design course opens students’ eyes to “plant blindness”

by Deborah Blackwell, Marketing & Communications Specialist
February 21, 2019

Design course opens students’ eyes to “plant blindness”

GSD arnold arboretum class

For three years now, master’s degree candidates in Field Methods and Living Collections, led by Rosetta S. Elkin and the Arboretum’s William “Ned” Friedman, have used social theory and a methodology that examines plant evolution, morphology, built neighborhoods, and landscape design to address “plant blindness”—the human tendency to take plants for granted, reducing them to a green fuzz in the background.

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Chickadees call back the sun

by Nancy Sableski, Manager of Children’s Education
December 19, 2018