Cryptomeria fever

by Jonathan Damery
April 6, 2018

A Tangled Tree

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
March 3, 2018

A Tangled Tree

Yesterday, a genuine New England Nor’easter struck, with phenomenal winds and drenching rain, but fortunately for the trees, no snow. This storm brought to mind one of our old Japanese red pines (Pinus densiflora 16536*C), collected by Charles Sprague Sargent (first director of the Arnold Arboretum) in 1892 in Japan. It bears the scars of […]

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A Mission Born and Sustained by Philanthropy

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
December 4, 2017

Why do white oak species germinate in the fall?

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
November 20, 2017

Why do white oak species germinate in the fall?

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Over the past few weeks, I have been repeatedly drawn to the North American oak collection on the southwest flank of Bussey Hill. There is something truly grand about this cathedral-like space, with soaring trunks and arched canopies meeting to create a magnificent vaulted ceiling overhead. You enter this architectural and botanical space and are set […]

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A Continuing Legacy of Conserving Plants

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
November 9, 2017

A Continuing Legacy of Conserving Plants

Conservation at the Arnold Arboretum

Dedicated to stewardship and discovery, the Arnold Arboretum advances conservation programs as an institutional priority. Founding Director Charles Sprague Sargent set the stage as author of the Forestry Census of 1884, a groundbreaking document in the formation of US conservation policy. Sargent also initiated the Arboretum’s pioneering work in plant exploration, extending global reach to […]

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Tomb with stone effigies, China, 1909

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
September 28, 2017

Tomb with stone effigies, China, 1909

Tomb with stone effigies, China, 1909

Tomb with stone effigies China Western Hupeh [Title from recto of mount.] Alternate Title: Tomb with animal statues in front and man beside Photograph by Ernest Henry Wilson (1876-1930), American, English China February 28, 1909 A larger version of this image is available in Harvard University’s Hollis+ catalog. Ernest Henry Wilson (1876-1930) was the furthest […]

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John Singer Sargent: Figures and Landscapes, 1914-1925

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
September 20, 2017

John Singer Sargent: Figures and Landscapes, 1914-1925

John Singer Sargent: Figures and Landscapes, 1914-1925

John Singer Sargent: Figures and Landscapes, 1914-1925: The Complete Paintings, Volume IX The last in a series of books devoted to the work of John Singer Sargent (1856–1925), this volume covers the figure and landscape works that Sargent produced between 1914 and 1925. The story begins with the artist painting with friends on vacation in […]

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Maps tell a story

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
August 1, 2017

Peking, China – Imperial Gardens, 1914

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
July 27, 2017

Peking, China – Imperial Gardens, 1914

Peking, China - Imperial Gardens, 1914

Peking, China – Imperial Gardens [Title from recto of mount.] Alternate Title: Rocks on pedestals by low wall beside lake Photograph by Frank Nicholas Meyer (1875-1918, Dutch, American) Santunying, Hebei Sheng, China April 10, 1914 A larger version of this image is available in HOLLIS, the online catalog of Harvard Library. Frank Nicholas Meyer began […]

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Focus on Phenology: Founder’s Fancies

by Danny Schissler, Research and Projects Coordinator, Friedman Lab
May 12, 2017

Focus on Phenology: Founder’s Fancies

Ribes aureum (Golden Currant)

Phenology–the study of the seasonal rhythm of plants and animals–is a science with deep roots in cultural practices throughout human history. Modern research examines trends in phenological data to help us understand our changing climate, but observation of the timing of biological events has long served social and economic purposes outside the realm of scientific […]

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