The Weird, Wooden Future of Skyscrapers

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
January 15, 2018

The Weird, Wooden Future of Skyscrapers

Wooden skyscraper

Wooden Skyscrapers Framework (pictured here), a 12-story mixed-use tower that will soon rise in Portland, Oregon’s Pearl District. When it’s finished (likely in 2019), it will be the country’s tallest human-occupied all-wooden structure. Although U.S. building codes generally bar wooden structures more than 85 feet tall, the federal government has recently promoted research into building […]

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As climate changes, so does wine

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
January 10, 2018

As climate changes, so does wine

winegrapes

Most wine is produced from the same 12 varieties of grapes, a huge concern for growers in the face of climate change. Elizabeth Wolkovich, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, and colleagues have published research suggesting the other ~1100 varieties of grapes and the diversity of their attributes may play an important role in the future of the wine […]

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Native Plants and the Crazy Snake Worm

by Brendan Keegan, Landscape Crew Gardener
November 20, 2017

Native Plants and the Crazy Snake Worm

Amynthas spp.

Last week, I came across several “crazy snake worms” happily wriggling through fallen leaves in the landscape. This was surprising, since the adults are usually gone by this point in the season, killed by hard autumn frost and survived only by their overwintering eggs. However, the unseasonably warm weather this year has prolonged the life […]

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A Very Detailed, Interactive Map of Chicago’s Tree Canopy

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
October 5, 2017

A Very Detailed, Interactive Map of Chicago’s Tree Canopy

Map of Chicago’s Tree Canopy

A Very Detailed, Interactive Map of Chicago’s Tree Canopy “It reveals some startling patterns.” via Atlas Obscura In June, the Chicago Regional Tree Initiative and Morton Arboretum released what they say is the most comprehensive tree canopy data set of any region in the U.S., covering 284 municipalities in the Chicago area. Now, that data […]

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An International Network of Trees

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
September 18, 2017

An International Network of Trees

Amanda Gallinat monitors fruit ripening

Each year we witness the seasonal schedules of plants—when they flower, fruit, and unfurl and drop their ‌leaves—in our gardens, parks, and wild areas. The details of these schedules are vitally important to pollinators, herbivores, and frugivores, and to horticulturists, farmers, landscape architects, and ecologists. Even so, we know surprisingly little about the phenology (or […]

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National Phenology Network Showcases Arnold Arboretum Tree Spotters

by Meghana Srinivasan, Marketing and Communications Specialist
August 14, 2017

Witness Tree

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
June 5, 2017

Taking the pulse of the planet

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
May 24, 2017

Nature’s Temples

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
May 3, 2017

Nature’s Temples

Nature's Temples

Nature’s Temples The Complex World of Old-Growth Forests by Joan Maloof An old-growth forest is one that has formed naturally over a long period of time with little or no disturbance from humankind. They are increasingly rare and largely misunderstood. In Nature’s Temples, Joan Maloof, the director of the Old-Growth Forest Network, makes a heartfelt […]

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What a year with a single tree reveals about climate change

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
May 2, 2017