Roads, spring, Hemlock Hill Road, 1940

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
June 7, 2019

Roads, spring, Hemlock Hill Road, 1940

Roads, spring, Hemlock Hill Road, 1940

Roads, spring, Hemlock Hill Road, 1940 Alternate Title: Mountain laurels (Kalmia latifolia) in bloom beside Hemlock Hill Road Photographer unknown Hemlock Hill Road, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, United States June 1940 A larger version of this image is available in HOLLIS Images. Mountain laurel is a large evergreen flowering shrub native to the eastern […]

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Complex responses to phenological cues

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
August 1, 2018

Complex responses to phenological cues

Understanding the role of different cues, like temperature and chilling, is important to predict how plant phenology, or the timing of life cycle events, will respond to climate change. Published in New Phytologist, Dan Flynn and Elizabeth (Lizzie) Wolkovich manipulated various cues using a growth chamber to understand this complex process. Abstract»

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A Meeting of Land and Sea: Nature and the Future of Martha’s Vineyard

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
January 12, 2018

A Meeting of Land and Sea: Nature and the Future of Martha’s Vineyard

A Meeting of Land and Sea: Nature and the Future of Martha’s Vineyard

A Meeting of Land and Sea: Nature and the Future of Martha’s Vineyard by David Foster An eminent ecologist shows how an iconic New England island has been shaped by nature and human history, and how its beloved landscape can be protected. Full of surprises, bedecked with gorgeous photographs and maps, and supported by unprecedented […]

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Thoreau and the Language of Trees

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
January 12, 2018

An International Network of Trees

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
September 18, 2017

An International Network of Trees

Amanda Gallinat monitors fruit ripening

Each year we witness the seasonal schedules of plants—when they flower, fruit, and unfurl and drop their ‌leaves—in our gardens, parks, and wild areas. The details of these schedules are vitally important to pollinators, herbivores, and frugivores, and to horticulturists, farmers, landscape architects, and ecologists. Even so, we know surprisingly little about the phenology (or […]

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Nature’s Temples

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
May 3, 2017

Nature’s Temples

Nature's Temples

Nature’s Temples The Complex World of Old-Growth Forests by Joan Maloof An old-growth forest is one that has formed naturally over a long period of time with little or no disturbance from humankind. They are increasingly rare and largely misunderstood. In Nature’s Temples, Joan Maloof, the director of the Old-Growth Forest Network, makes a heartfelt […]

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Pinus cembra: From the Alps to the Arboretum

by Brendan Keegan, Landscape Crew Gardener
March 7, 2017

Pinus cembra: From the Alps to the Arboretum

Pinus cembra, Swiss Stone Pine

I recently caught up with some friends who had just returned from backpacking in the Austrian Alps. As we chatted about their trip, they opened a bottle of zirbenschnapps, a traditional Austrian spirit (often homemade) flavored with a distillation made from the cones of Pinus cembra, the Swiss stone pine. After a few sips, my first thought […]

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Focus on Phenology: Early Shows and Late Snows

by Danny Schissler, Project Coordinator
April 11, 2016

Focus on Phenology: Early Shows and Late Snows

Magnolia x loebneri (Loebner Magnolia) and Magnolia 'Elizabeth'

Here in New England, springtime can feel like an emotional rollercoaster. A bout of 60-degree days, t-shirts and sun can suddenly become a week-long cold snap and a half-foot of wet snow. This year, between the 3rd and 6th of March, Boston experienced a temperature fluctuation of 56 degrees! Less than two weeks later, the temperature had plunged […]

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Maria Sibylla Merian: The First Ecologist?

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
March 2, 2016

Maria Sibylla Merian: The First Ecologist?

Kay Etheridge, PhD

Kay Etheridge, PhD, Professor of Biology, Gettysburg College Tuesday, March 29, 7:00–8:30pm Location: Hunnewell Building In 1699 a 52 year-old artist/naturalist embarked in Amsterdam for a two-month sailing voyage to the Dutch colony of Surinam in South America. Maria Sibylla Merian then spent two years in the tropical forests of Surinam studying insects and their […]

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Civic Ecology: Healing and Growing in Community

by Pam Thompson, Manager of Adult Education
January 23, 2016

Civic Ecology: Healing and Growing in Community

Marianne E. Krasny, PhD, Professor, Department of Natural Resources, and Director, Civic Ecology Lab, Cornell University Thursday, March 3, 7:00–8:30pm, Hunnewell Building, Arnold Arboretum Community gardening and forestry, participatory watershed restoration…in communities around the world there is a growing phenomenon. People are coming together to rebuild and restore local environments affected by crisis, disaster, or […]

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