Insects prefer yellow

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
June 11, 2018

Insects prefer yellow

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Every spring and summer, I keep an eye out for species whose flowers regularly change color, typically from yellow to red. This is especially evident among the buckeyes and horse-chestnuts (Aesculus) where just-opened flowers will have prominent splotches of yellow (to attract insect pollinators) that change to red (upper image; Aesculus turbinata, Japanese horsechestnut; 219-35*A) over the […]

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In Conversation With Hope Jahren

by Meghana Srinivasan, Marketing and Communications Specialist
November 8, 2017

Cutting Edge Research in the Living Collections

by Meghana Srinivasan, Marketing and Communications Specialist
October 3, 2017

Cutting Edge Research in the Living Collections

The Arnold Arboretum’s Living Collections are a world-wide resource for investigations across the spectrum of botanical, environmental and horticultural sciences. With the addition of the Weld Hill Research Building and its state-of-the-art research facilities in 2011, the Arboretum’s capacity for conducting and promoting research in the collections continues to grow. The Arboretum also offers merit-based awards and fellowships to undergraduates, […]

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Science IRL Features Arboretum Scientists on Butterfly Behavior and Plant Evolution

by Meghana Srinivasan, Marketing and Communications Specialist
October 19, 2016

Science IRL Features Arboretum Scientists on Butterfly Behavior and Plant Evolution

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How can butterfly behavior influence plant evolution? On the latest episode of Science IRL, Arnold Arboretum scientists Robin Hopkins and Heather Briggs take us through their research investigating this question. Watch the episode to get an inside look at their research into the effects of pipevine swallowtail behavior on the evolution of flower color in […]

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Lucretius at the Arnold Arboretum

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
August 20, 2016

Lucretius at the Arnold Arboretum

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In the beginning earth gave birth to plants After their kind, and ringed with shining green The hill and plains. The flowering meadows shone With verdure. Then between the various trees A mighty race began, all galloping To be the first to shoot up into the sky.*   Yesterday, standing at the base of a […]

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Darwin by Post

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
May 30, 2016

Flowering vegetation in the North Meadow with willows and Dawn Redwood, 1970

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
February 11, 2016

Flowering vegetation in the North Meadow with willows and Dawn Redwood, 1970

Dawn Redwood, 1970

North Meadow, spring, willows, Dawn Redwood, 1970 Alternate Title: Flowering vegetation in the North Meadow with willows (Salix) and Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) in the background Photograph by Pamela Bruns (American) North Meadow, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, United States 1970 A larger version of this image is available in Harvard University’s HOLLIS+ catalog. The […]

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The swimming of the Ginkgo sperm

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
September 11, 2015

The swimming of the Ginkgo sperm

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It is happening right now at the Arnold Arboretum – this very week. One of the most bizarre mating rituals imaginable is playing out on our female (seed-bearing) ginkgo trees. Inside the beautiful inch-in-diameter seeds, pairs of huge sperm are being produced by the pollen tubes that grew out of the pollen grains released by […]

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Community roles in evolution

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
September 21, 2014

Reproductive isolation

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
September 15, 2014