An International Network of Trees

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
September 18, 2017

An International Network of Trees

Amanda Gallinat monitors fruit ripening

Each year we witness the seasonal schedules of plants—when they flower, fruit, and unfurl and drop their ‌leaves—in our gardens, parks, and wild areas. The details of these schedules are vitally important to pollinators, herbivores, and frugivores, and to horticulturists, farmers, landscape architects, and ecologists. Even so, we know surprisingly little about the phenology (or […]

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National Phenology Network Showcases Arnold Arboretum Tree Spotters

by Meghana Srinivasan, Marketing and Communications Specialist
August 14, 2017

Phenology and wine grapes

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
August 2, 2017

Taking the pulse of the planet

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
May 24, 2017

Focus on Phenology: Founder’s Fancies

by Danny Schissler, Research and Projects Coordinator, Friedman Lab
May 12, 2017

Focus on Phenology: Founder’s Fancies

Ribes aureum (Golden Currant)

Phenology–the study of the seasonal rhythm of plants and animals–is a science with deep roots in cultural practices throughout human history. Modern research examines trends in phenological data to help us understand our changing climate, but observation of the timing of biological events has long served social and economic purposes outside the realm of scientific […]

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What a year with a single tree reveals about climate change

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
May 2, 2017

Focus on Phenology: April Ephemera

by Danny Schissler, Research and Projects Coordinator, Friedman Lab
April 14, 2017

Focus on Phenology: April Ephemera

Crocus vernus (Spring Crocus, Giant Crocus)

Arboretum visitors are not the only ones enjoying this week’s early spring sunshine. Across the grounds, swaths of colorful spring ephemerals have poked their parts above the soil to take advantage of unobstructed access to sunlight. These perennial woodland wildflowers produce stems, leaves and flowers well before the leafing-out of woody understory and canopy species. […]

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Focus on Phenology: Spring Unsprung

by Danny Schissler, Research and Projects Coordinator, Friedman Lab
March 7, 2017

Focus on Phenology: Spring Unsprung

Honey bee visiting Ozark Witch-hazel (Hamamelis vernalis)

Can you remember February 24, a balmy 73 degree day that brought flocks of visitors to the Arboretum? In the ample sunshine and unseasonably warm temperatures, it felt as though spring had suddenly arrived on the grounds. And indeed, with a week-long spate of warm weather came swelling buds, early-blooming perennials, and honey bees buzzing […]

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Botany Blast: Seeing Climate Change in Your Backyard

by Meghana Srinivasan, Marketing and Communications Specialist
January 17, 2017

Botany Blast: Seeing Climate Change in Your Backyard

Hamamelis vernalis

Botany Blast: Seeing Climate Change in Your Backyard Alyssa Rosemartin, Partner & Application Specialist, The USA National Phenology Network 1 Session: Sunday, January 22, 2:30–3:30pm Location: Hunnewell Building Learn what you can do to help scientists in their studies of the effects of a changing climate on plants and animals. Alyssa Rosemartin of the USA […]

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Focus on Phenology: What’s Eating You?

by Danny Schissler, Research and Projects Coordinator, Friedman Lab
January 3, 2017

Focus on Phenology: What’s Eating You?

Fagus grandifolia (American Beech)

There is a slumbering subterranean fire in nature which never goes out, and which no cold can chill. -Henry David Thoreau, A Winter Walk (1843) Winter is upon us, and what better way to beat the indoor-blues than with a crisp afternoon walk through the Arboretum? While autumn’s hues have come and gone, a world […]

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