Acting Locally to Understand Global Change

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
April 16, 2019

Acting Locally to Understand Global Change

Dig Deeper into climate studies at the Arboretum

As a center for plant science, the Arnold Arboretum contributes to the study of our changing planet. At Weld Hill, state-of-the-art laboratories and tools enable researchers to investigate how plants will respond to changes like higher concentrations of carbon in the atmosphere. An ongoing project with Boston University collects data on nitrogen and other atmospheric […]

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Spotlight on seasonal shifts in trees

by Kristel Schoonderwoerd, Fellow of the Arnold Arboretum
April 8, 2019

Spotlight on seasonal shifts in trees

carya ovata bud burst

One of the joys of living in the temperate world is to experience the days lengthening in spring, the temperatures increasing, and our woody vegetation waking up in response. After a long hiatus, we suddenly see trees flushing flowers and leaves and we realize that their development has silently snuck up on us. These noiseless […]

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Complex responses to phenological cues

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
August 1, 2018

Complex responses to phenological cues

Understanding the role of different cues, like temperature and chilling, is important to predict how plant phenology, or the timing of life cycle events, will respond to climate change. Published in New Phytologist, Dan Flynn and Elizabeth (Lizzie) Wolkovich manipulated various cues using a growth chamber to understand this complex process. Abstract»

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As climate changes, so does wine

by Peter Reuell for The Harvard Gazette
January 10, 2018

As climate changes, so does wine

winegrapes

Most wine is produced from the same 12 varieties of grapes, a huge concern for growers in the face of climate change. Elizabeth Wolkovich, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, and colleagues have published research suggesting the other ~1100 varieties of grapes and the diversity of their attributes may play an important role in the future of the wine industry. Read more in the Harvard Gazette.

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Citizen scientists take the pulse of Arnold Arboretum trees

by Amanda McGowan for WGBH
November 15, 2017

An International Network of Trees

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
September 18, 2017

An International Network of Trees

Amanda Gallinat monitors fruit ripening

Each year we witness the seasonal schedules of plants—when they flower, fruit, and unfurl and drop their ‌leaves—in our gardens, parks, and wild areas. The details of these schedules are vitally important to pollinators, herbivores, and frugivores, and to horticulturists, farmers, landscape architects, and ecologists. Even so, we know surprisingly little about the phenology (or […]

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National Phenology Network showcases Arnold Arboretum Tree Spotters

by USA National Phenology Network
August 14, 2017

Phenology and wine grapes

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
August 2, 2017

Taking the pulse of the planet

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
May 24, 2017

Focus on Phenology: Founder’s Fancies

by Danny Schissler, Project Coordinator
May 12, 2017

Focus on Phenology: Founder’s Fancies

Ribes aureum (Golden Currant)

Phenology–the study of the seasonal rhythm of plants and animals–is a science with deep roots in cultural practices throughout human history. Modern research examines trends in phenological data to help us understand our changing climate, but observation of the timing of biological events has long served social and economic purposes outside the realm of scientific […]

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