The lost art of looking at plants

by Heidi Ledford for Nature
January 29, 2018

The lost art of looking at plants

2017 Plant Anatomy Summer Course

Although the genomics era led many plant biologists away from physiology and morphology, the latest generation of technological advances is steering them back. Read about how imaging technology in particular is renewing the appetite to study plant diversity, fueled by initiatives such as the Arboretum’s summer short course in plant morphology. Read more in Nature.

Continue reading


Mountain chestnut oaks outsmart squirrels!

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
December 2, 2017

Mountain chestnut oaks outsmart squirrels!

DirectorsBlog_mountain oaks

Two weeks ago, I wondered why the acorns of mountain chestnut oak (Quercus montana), like most other species in the white oak section of the genus, germinate soon after hitting the ground in the fall. This week, I excavated a seedling, and as you can see, the root system is already well developed, although the […]

Continue reading


The World’s Longest-Running Experiment is Buried in a Secret Spot in Michigan

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
April 27, 2016

The World’s Longest-Running Experiment is Buried in a Secret Spot in Michigan

William James Beal

The World’s Longest-Running Experiment is Buried in a Secret Spot in Michigan feature by Cara Giaimo, Atlas Obscura In the fall of 1879, Dr. William James Beal (1833-1924) walked to a secret spot on Michigan State University’s campus and planted a strange crop: 20 narrow-necked glass bottles, each filled with a mixture of moist sand […]

Continue reading


Giant Pumpkins

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
November 2, 2015