Hopkins receives grant to study how plants choose mates

by Deborah Blackwell, Marketing & Communications Specialist
December 13, 2019

Hopkins receives grant to study how plants choose mates

Robin Hopkins

This spring, the greenhouses in the Weld Hill Research Building at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University will be overflowing with phlox, fragrant flowers bursting with hues of violet, pink, red, and magenta. But it’s not their floral beauty or aroma that captivates Robin Hopkins, assistant professor of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard. Hopkins, […]

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Glowing brilliant red Chinese endemic shrubs at the Arboretum

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
October 22, 2018

Glowing brilliant red Chinese endemic shrubs at the Arboretum

Heptacodium miconioides

Seventy-three years is a long wait. That’s what it took between the Arnold Arboretum’s Ernest Henry Wilson (the great explorer of Asian plant biodiversity in the early twentieth century) first observing seven son flower (Heptacodium miconioides) in Hubei in 1907 and its arrival in the living collections here in Boston. Only in 1980, with the […]

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Trapped for a noble cause

by Harold Suárez-Baron, Arnold Arboretum Deland Fellow
October 3, 2018

Trapped for a noble cause

Harold Suarez Baron

by Harold Suárez-Baron, Arnold Arboretum Deland Fellow Flowering plants represent nearly ninety-five percent of all described species in the plant kingdom and display extraordinary diversity in their floral anatomy. This astonishing variation is paralleled by the sophisticated ways in which flowers are pollinated. For many plants pollination occurs through an interplay of visual, olfactory, and […]

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September beauty

by Jonathan Damery, Editor of Arnoldia
September 14, 2018

Diversity in wind-pollinated plants

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
June 28, 2018

Diversity in wind-pollinated plants

Juan Losada

While diversity in flower structure, color, and morphology has been studied extensively in animal-pollinated plants , much less is understood about why wind-pollinated plants also exhibit diversity in reproductive structures. Published in Annals of Botany, Juan Losada, Fellow of the Arnold Arboretum, and Andrew Leslie, Assistant Professor at Brown University examined this diversity in conifers. Abstract»

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Secret scents

by Jonathan Damery, Editor of Arnoldia
June 27, 2018

Spring larch pilgrimage

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
April 17, 2018

Spring larch pilgrimage

larch cones_directorsblog_featuredIMG

My favorite sign of early spring is not the zen magnolia in flower, or the yellow-flowered dogwoods, or the smashing pussy willows with their catkins on full display – in fact it isn’t anything in flower.  Rather, it is something in “cone.”  For me, the absolute high point right now is to catch a glimpse of […]

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Catapulting pollen

by Faye Rosin, Director of Research Facilitation
March 1, 2018

Conifers from around the world; perennial wildflowers from New England

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
September 11, 2017

Conifers from around the world; perennial wildflowers from New England

wildflowers_DirectorsBlog 9.10_featuredIMG

As autumn begins to set in, it is getting harder and harder to find woody plants in flower at the Arnold Arboretum. And, humans aren’t the only ones to lament the diminution of flowering in September – insects do too! Under the visionary leadership of Andrew Gapinski, Manager of Horticulture, the Arboretum has been working […]

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What’s Bugging You?

by Nancy Rose
April 12, 2016