Secret scents

by Jonathan Damery, Associate Editor of Arnoldia
June 27, 2018

Secret scents

Something about a linden tree (Tilia spp.) seems to wish to be secret. The leaves resemble lopsided hearts on many species and are decidedly green. No pretention, no drama, and even the most esteemed examples—I’m thinking, for instance, of the littleleaf linden (T. cordata) growing behind the Longfellow House in Cambridge, which was purportedly planted […]

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Tilia tomentosa, Arnold Arboretum, 1945

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
March 29, 2018

Tilia tomentosa, Arnold Arboretum, 1945

Tilia tomentosa

Tilia tomentosa, Arnold Arboretum, 1945 [Title from recto of mount.] Photograph by Joseph Francis Charles Rock (1884-1962, American, Austrian) Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, United States September 1945 Tilia tomentosa, also known as silver linden in the United States and silver lime in the United Kingdom, is a species of flowering plant in the family […]

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Roads, winter, Meadow Road, snow, 1966

by Larissa Glasser, Library Assistant
February 1, 2018

Roads, winter, Meadow Road, snow, 1966

Roads, winter, Meadow Road, snow, 1966

Roads, winter, Meadow Road, snow, 1966 Alternate Title: Meadow Road in the snow near the Linden (Tilia) Collection Photographer unknown Meadow Road, Linden Collection, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, United States January 1966 A larger version of this image is available in Hollis Images. Commonly called linden, lime, and basswood, Tilia are mostly large, deciduous […]

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Bract Facts

by Nancy Rose
June 17, 2016

Bract Facts

Linden - Tilia by Robert-Mayer

Bracts are specialized plant structures that serve varied functions such as attracting pollinators and protecting inflorescences (flower structures). Often leaflike, bracts range from the inconspicuous to the wildly showy. Perhaps the best example of the latter is poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), whose bright red bracts surround the inconspicuous yellow-green flowers and are often mistaken for petals. […]

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