Glowing brilliant red Chinese endemic shrubs at the Arboretum

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
October 22, 2018

Glowing brilliant red Chinese endemic shrubs at the Arboretum

Heptacodium miconioides

Seventy-three years is a long wait. That’s what it took between the Arnold Arboretum’s Ernest Henry Wilson (the great explorer of Asian plant biodiversity in the early twentieth century) first observing seven son flower (Heptacodium miconioides) in Hubei in 1907 and its arrival in the living collections here in Boston. Only in 1980, with the […]

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Arboretum recognized for two new nationally accredited collections

by Deborah Blackwell, Marketing & Communications Specialist
October 12, 2018

Arboretum recognized for two new nationally accredited collections

Forsythia x intermedia 'Karl Sax' 253-2005-B Michael Dosmann

Ginkgo and Forsythia holdings acknowledged for research and conservation value by Deborah Blackwell, Marketing & Communications Specialist The Plant Collections Network (PCN) of the American Public Gardens Association recently bestowed national accreditation status to two genera in the Arnold Arboretum’s collections: Forsythia and Ginkgo. Along with six previously recognized genera—Acer (maple), Carya (hickory), Fagus (beech), […]

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Carbon tax on beech trees!

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
October 1, 2018

Carbon tax on beech trees!

Beech drops

A serendipitous encounter with a magnificent population of beech-drops on Peters Hill has really made my week. Beech-drops (Epifagus virginiana) is a flowering plant whose ancestors lost the ability to photosynthesize. It obtains all of its organic carbon by invading the fine roots of American beech trees (Fagus grandifolia). Not a touch of green can […]

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Rhododendron? Hydrangea? America doesn’t know anymore

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
August 15, 2018

Billions of buds are opening

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
May 8, 2018

Billions of buds are opening

DirectorsBlog5.5.2018 BudBurst_featuredIMG

Come. Now! There is an urgency to the explosion of billions of buds in the Arnold Arboretum right now. For the better part of a year, this growing season’s leaves and flowers have been encased in the dormant buds of every tree, shrub, and liana, waiting for the appropriate environmental signals to engorge with water, swell, […]

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Two wheelbarrows

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
April 8, 2018

In plant tug-of-war, mom wins

by Jon Hetman, Director of External Relations & Communications
March 15, 2018

Felled by the wind

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
March 13, 2018

Felled by the wind

DirectorsBlog3.11.2018_felled_featuredIMG

More than 20 large trees in the Arnold Arboretum came down or were severely damaged in the brutal Nor’easter on March 1, including several centenarians with important provenance. Most of the trees toppled by the winds had significant rot or underlying structural issues; it was only a matter of time. Like us, trees age, grow […]

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A Tangled Tree

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
March 3, 2018

A Tangled Tree

Yesterday, a genuine New England Nor’easter struck, with phenomenal winds and drenching rain, but fortunately for the trees, no snow. This storm brought to mind one of our old Japanese red pines (Pinus densiflora 16536*C), collected by Charles Sprague Sargent (first director of the Arnold Arboretum) in 1892 in Japan. It bears the scars of […]

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Smooth and colorful bark

by William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum
January 16, 2018

Smooth and colorful bark

Winter Bark_DirectorsBlog1.13.2018

There is nothing quite so wonderful as the colors of smooth bark at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University (we will deal with deeply furrowed bark another day). Without leaves and flowers to distract, bark can be the central focus of a winter outing. Here are twelve of my favorites in the digital equivalent of […]

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