Gathering Historias

Stories that evoke connections between the natural world and the Latino communities surrounding the Arnold Arboretum and beyond

Gathering Historias envisions an outdoor landscape that fully includes and connects the stories of our expanding Latino communities. Developed by Steven Fisher, a master’s degree candidate at the Harvard Divinity School, this project recognizes that the diverse voices of Latino communities can contribute to our cultural narratives of the environment. “In the midst of my learning, I proposed what became Gathering Historias: an audio-illustration project that amplifies the voices of Latin Americans who valued nature and who now call Boston home. In this work I encountered gardeners, naturalists, and newly-weds, moments of grief and awe, voices in Spanish and English, and of course, the power that comes from finding a sanctuary in the natural world.”

With the distinct challenges we all face in a time of social distancing, stories like these resonate deeply and illustrate the profound connections humanity develops with nature. Now more than ever we must turn to our stories—in Spanish, nuestras historias—to find solace, rekindle memories, and spark new journeys and new stories of the outdoors.

Read a story about the “Gathering Historias” initiative [Lee este artículo en español], Steven Fisher, and the importance of his work sharing compelling cultural narratives from members of the Latino community


Click on each of the drawings below for audio and bilingual transcripts of Gathering Historias interviewees.

Gathering Historias - Christopher Montero by Steven Fisher
Gathering Historias - Roberto Nuñez and Cara Forsyth by Steven Fisher
Gathering Historias - Wendy Estrada by Steven Fisher
Gathering Historias - Tania Erlij by Steven Fisher
Gathering Historias - Hannah Lopez by Steven Fisher
Gathering Historias - Alejita Alvaracin by Steven Fisher

Christopher Montero: These species these trees, these plants, these birds are significant for me because this is part of my immediate reality now.

Credits
Christopher Montero
Steven Fisher
April 23, 2020

English

Steven Salido Fisher, host: You’re listening to Gathering Historias, an initiative of the Arnold Arboretum.

[Music: “En las andadas” by Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Christopher Montero: These species these trees, these plants, these birds are significant for me because this is part of my immediate reality now.

Fisher: I’m Steven Salido Fisher and I record the diverse stories of Latina and Latino people in Greater Boston. I want to celebrate their experiences in nature and capture the spirit of our presence when it comes to the world’s environment. In this story we hear from Chris. A teacher naturalist who has worked all over the world, Chris now works here at Boston at the Mass. Audubon Society. We spoke together at Jamaica Plain here at the Visitor’s Center at the Arnold Arboretum.

Chris: Hello. My name is Christopher Montero. I go by Chris Montero. I'm originally from Costa Rica and a new transplant to Massachusetts. I've been living in the United States for about 15 years. My background is biology but I'm also an artist. I work as a teacher naturalist for the Mass Audubon Boston Nature Center, and very excited about being part of this community now.

My mom was a single mom and we lived with my grandparents until I was around three or four. I spent out..my grandma had this one of these yards that is very common in Latin America that you see they have fruit trees, it's a tiny yard, but they were fruit trees and they were lizards and cats of the neighbor would come and my grandma would feed the cats and she had parakeets and parrots. I spent hours and as a toddler basically just playing and catching lizards, turtle pets and my whole life I had reptiles and different creatures. I love snakes, big snake fan. A big influence with my grandpa. I think grandpa was very supportive in my interest for nature and he would give me books about wildlife.

He would take me fishing. He would show me constellations he would tell me stories about the Amazonian forest and to me as a kid that was very very powerful because it was from him from whom I heard about anacondas, piranhas, and all these type of things so. It clearly created a big mark on me. That's why I think eventually followed my career in wildlife. When I work with students, there are so many good moments, but the general is like, sometimes to me, and I will say this sometimes for me, it's more important to learn taxonomy of birds, for instance, or plants, to have a life-changing experience, a connection with nature, a way to see nature differently and to see the bigger picture how I am part of nature. I had really beautiful experiences like being a fan of snakes, for instance of reptiles. A lot of people have a lot of preconceived ideas and fears about snakes.

I had the honor of work with students that are ophidiophobic. They are terrified a snakes just inside. They cannot even see any pictures. My grandma was like that. La probe abuela [English: My poor grandmother] where like she was terrified of snakes and she had this grandson that was always chasing snakes. Perhaps one of the most amazing memories is when I have had students that are like, oh, man, I'm not touching that thing. I'm like, hold it well. I had students that had been on the fast lane, we're in an expedition is two-three weeks. I had a student in Belize. I remember she's from India, and she had a very unpleasant experience in early childhood with a cobra. Anyway, long story short at the end of that traveling expedition she dared to touch a harmless snake obviously and held a snake in her hands.

She was so moved about it, is not only again the connecting moment with a snake and overcoming that fear that had been with her, she was a teenager, but her whole life that she gave me this mala, this rosary. She gave it to me like, not really, this means so much to me. I still have it. It was, like 10, 12 years ago so that was really cool. Yes, and I'm not expecting again, children in urban areas to have the possibility to become biology or naturalists always, but as long as you care as long as you remember. I think it's very important because going back to this historic time that we are in, our civilization has grown apart separating humans from nature. This place [Arnold Arboretum and Mass Audubon Nature Center] offer that opportunity to reconnect with nature. That this is our neighborhood. This is my region. I live now in the Northeast where it's no longer the Pacific Northwest.

Well this is my home now. These species, these trees, these plants, these birds are significant for me because this is part of my immediate reality now and my reality is even bigger, I think about the East Coast or North America now, but guess what: I have roots in Latin America and I keep opening my lens to a bigger perspective. This is our home. This is where we make our stand as a species. I know I'm meandering around but I think is important this place it reminds us that we're not supposed to be that far away from nature.

[Music: instrumental guitar]

Fisher: Our thanks to Chris who spoke with us and shared his story. This was produced by me, Steven Salido Fisher, and supported through the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, and the good folks over at the Lamont Library Media Lab.

Spanish

Steven Salido Fisher, anfitrión: Estás escuchando las Historias de Gathering, una iniciativa del Arnold Arboretum.

[Música: “En las andadas” por Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Christopher Montero: Estas especies, estos árboles, estas plantas, estas aves son importantes para mí porque ahora esto es parte de mi realidad inmediata.

Fisher: Soy Steven Salido Fisher y grabo diversas historias de latinos y latinas en el Gran Boston. Quiero celebrar sus experiencias en la naturaleza y capturar el espíritu de nuestra presencia cuando se trata el medio ambiente del mundo. En esta historia escuchamos acerca de Chris. Un maestro naturalista que ha trabajado en todo el mundo, Chris ahora trabaja aquí en Boston en la Mass. Audubon Society. Hablamos juntos en Jamaica Plain aquí en el Centro de visitantes del Arnold Arboretum.

Chris: Hola. Me llamo Christopher Montero. Pero soy conocido como Chris Montero. Soy originario de Costa Rica y ahora estoy radicado en Massachusetts. He estado viviendo en los Estados Unidos por cerca de 15 años. Mi formación es en biología, pero también soy artista. Trabajo como maestro naturalista para el Centro Natural Mass Audubon en Boston, y estoy muy emocionado de ser parte de esta comunidad ahora.

Mi madre era madre soltera y vivimos con mis abuelos hasta que tuve alrededor de tres o cuatro años. Pasaba tiempo afuera…mi abuela tenía uno de esos patios que son muy comunes en América Latina, en el que puedes ver que hay árboles frutales, era un patio pequeño, pero había árboles frutales, lagartijas y venían los gatos del vecino y mi abuela los alimentaba, y tenía periquitos y loros. Pasé horas, cuando era niño, básicamente jugando; atrapaba lagartijas, tenía tortugas de mascotas y toda mi vida tuve reptiles y diferentes criaturas. Me encantan las serpientes, soy un gran fanático de las serpientes. Mi abuelo fue una gran influencia. Creo que el abuelo me apoyo mucho en mi interés por la naturaleza y me daba libros sobre la vida silvestre.

Me llevaba a pescar. Me mostraba constelaciones, me contaba historias sobre el bosque Amazónico y para mí, cuando era niño, era muy muy poderoso, porque era de él de quien escuché sobre anacondas, pirañas y todo este tipo de cosas. Claramente dejó una gran marca en mí. Pienso que es la razón por la cual seguí mi carrera en la vida silvestre. Cuando trabajo con estudiantes, hay muchos buenos momentos, pero en general es, a veces para mí, y lo diré, a veces para mí es más importante aprender la taxonomía de las aves, por ejemplo, o las plantas, para tener un experiencia que cambia la vida, una conexión con la naturaleza, una forma de ver la naturaleza de manera diferente y ver el panorama general de cómo soy parte de la naturaleza. Tuve experiencias realmente hermosas, como ser fanático de las serpientes, por ejemplo, y de los reptiles. Mucha gente tiene muchas ideas preconcebidas y temores sobre las serpientes.

Tuve el honor de trabajar con estudiantes que son ofidio fóbicos. Están aterrorizados profundamente por las serpientes. Ni siquiera pueden ver ninguna foto. Mi abuela era así. La pobre abuela [en inglés: My poor grandmother] estaba aterrorizada por las serpientes y tenía un nieto que siempre estaba persiguiendo serpientes. Quizás uno de los recuerdos más sorprendentes es cuando he tenido estudiantes que dicen, oh, hombre, no estoy tocando esa cosa. Yo dije, sostenlo bien. Tuve estudiantes que iban por el carril rápido, estaban en una expedición en dos o tres semanas. Tuve una estudiante en Belice. Recuerdo que era de la India, y tuvo una experiencia muy desagradable en la primera infancia con una cobra. De todos modos, larga historia, corta al final de esa expedición de viaje, se atrevió a tocar una serpiente inofensiva, obviamente, y sostuvo una serpiente en sus manos.

Estaba tan conmovida por eso, no sólo por el momento de conexión con una serpiente y de superar el miedo que había estado con ella, era una adolescente, por toda su vida y me dio este mala, este rosario. Ella me lo dio y significa mucho para mí. Todavía lo tengo. Fue como hace 10, 12 años, así que fue realmente genial. Sí, y no espero otra vez, los niños de las zonas urbanas tienen la posibilidad de convertirse en biólogos o naturalistas siempre, pero siempre y cuando les importe, siempre y cuando recuerden. Creo que es muy importante porque volviendo a este tiempo histórico en el que estamos, en nuestra civilización se ha separado al humano de la naturaleza. Este lugar [Arnold Arboretum y el Centro Natural Mass Audubon] ofrece esa oportunidad de reconectarse con la naturaleza. Que este es nuestro barrio. Esta es mi región. Ahora vivo en el Noreste, donde ya no es el Noroeste del Pacífico.

Bueno, esta es mi casa ahora. Estas especies, estos árboles, estas plantas, estas aves son importantes para mí porque esto es ahora parte de mi realidad inmediata y mi realidad es aún más grande, pienso en la costa este o en América del Norte ahora, pero adivina qué: tengo raíces en América Latina y yo sigo abriendo mi mente a una perspectiva más amplia. Esta es nuestra casa. Aquí es donde hacemos nuestro lugar como especie. Sé que estoy deambulando, pero creo que es importante este lugar que nos recuerda que no debemos estar tan lejos de la naturaleza.

[Música: guitarra instrumental]

Fisher: Nuestro agradecimiento a Chris que habló con nosotros y compartió su historia. Esto fue producido por mí, Steven Salido Fisher, y apoyado a través del Arnold Arboretum, la Escuela de la Divinidad de Harvard y las buena personas en el Laboratorio de Medios de la Biblioteca de Lamont.

Roberto Nuñez and Cara Forsyth: It was a really special moment and a really beautiful day.

Credits
Roberto Nuñez and Cara Forsyth
Steven Fisher
April 23, 2020

English

Steven Salido Fisher, host: You’re listening to Gathering Historias, an initiative of the Arnold Arboretum.

Cara Forsyth: Yeah, it was a really special moment and a really beautiful day.

[Music: “En las andadas” by Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Fisher: I’m Steven Salido Fisher and I record the diverse stories of Latina and Latino people in Greater Boston. I want to celebrate their experiences in nature and capture the spirit of our presence when it comes to the world’s environment.

In this story we hear from Roberto and Cara. Just a note on audio quality. This is a recording I met Cara and Roberto after a series of attempts to capture their voices outside the studio booth. While this recording is less produced, we hope you can still enter into the spirit of their story: the laughter, the intimacy, and the humor they both have to share. I’m going go ahead and let Roberto and Cara introduce themselves.

Cara: Hi. My name is Cara Forsyth and I'm married to Roberto Nunez. [Laughter] As you can tell, I didn't change my last name [laughter]. We live in Boston. I'm originally from Pennsylvania from Lancaster.

Roberto Nuñez: I'm Roberto Nunez. As you can hear from my accent, I'm from Mexico and I'm happy to be here in Boston with this cold.

Fisher: Roberto and Cara were one of the first people to reach out to me when we announced Gathering Historias. The Arnold Arboretum holds a special place in their hearts. After much anticipation and planning, Roberto proposed to Cara at the Arnold Arboretum.

Roberto: I put the ring in my backpack and we went there. Seems like as minute one she starts saying this is so pretty. This is so nice. I was like "Okay" [laughs] Now I have to get the strength to do it and then actually wait until the very very last moment but I'm thinking we were like three hours there.

Cara: Yes. We were just wandering around.

Roberto: That's what I-- We were about to leave and I said, "Okay," I got to do it now.

Cara: Yes, we were about to leave and he's like, let's just go sit up on those trees for like five minutes. I was like okay and so we went up this little hill. Then, he's like I have a present for you and I was like “Oh really?” Then, he just opened his backpack and pulled out the ring box. I was like no, they're probably earrings or something. Then, I was like "Oh, no! It's not earrings!” [laughs] and so I shut it and I gave it back because I was like what is happening? Yeah, it was a really special moment and a really beautiful day.

Fisher: Several months later Robero and Cara celebrated their wedding at the Arboretum itself. They recall their favorite moment, their wedding vows.

Roberto: The vows, I think they were very very emotional. I think that was my favorite moment. The actual ceremony. Her dad organized these vows. He did an amazing job really.

Cara: Yes, so he gave an opening, a prayer. Then, he also gave a poem of the tree by Joyce Kilmer which he found.

Roberto: That poem was very nice [crosstalk].

Cara: Yes. You want to read it?

Roberto: I think you will be better because it’s in English [crosstalk].

Cara: No, I'm going to cry if I read it. Can you read it?

Roberto: I think you will cry anyway. I can read it. Just pardon my English. I will read how it says everything.

The place we stand in is special to Robby and Cara. Robby proposed to Cara here and this place is a refuge for them. A place where they can enjoy time together in God's lovely creation. And now the poem says: “I think that I shall never see a poem as lovely as a tree. A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed against the earth's sweet flowing breast. A tree that looks at God all day and lifts her leafy arms to pray. A tree that may in summer wear a nest of robins in her hair. Upon whose bosom snow has lain. Who intimately lives with rain. Poems are made by fools like me but only God can make a tree.”

[Music: instrumental guitar]

Fisher: Our thanks to Cara and Roberto who spoke with us and shared her story. If you’d like to read the poem Trees by Joyce Kilmer, we invite you to search it on the Poetry Foundation website. This was produced by me, Steven Salido Fisher, and supported through the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, and the good folks over at the Lamont Library Media Lab.

Thank you very much. Until next time.

Spanish

Steven Salido Fisher, anfitrión: Estás escuchando Historias de Gathering, una iniciativa de Arnold Arboretum.

Cara Forsyth: Sí, fue un momento realmente especial y un día realmente hermoso.

[Música: “En las andadas” por Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Fisher: Soy Steven Salido Fisher y grabo las diversas historias de latinas y latinos en el Gran Boston. Quiero celebrar sus experiencias en la naturaleza y capturar el espíritu de nuestra presencia cuando se trata del medio ambiente en el mundo.

En esta historia escuchamos a Roberto y Cara. Solo una aclaración sobre la calidad de audio. Esta es una grabación de cuando conocí a Cara y a Roberto, después de una serie de intentos de capturar sus voces fuera de la cabina del estudio. Si bien esta grabación se reproduce con menos calidad, esperamos que aún puedan entender el espíritu de su historia: la risa, la intimidad y el humor que ambos tienen para compartir. Voy a seguir adelante y dejar que Roberto y Cara se presenten.

Cara: Hola. Mi nombre es Cara Forsyth y estoy casada con Roberto Nunez. [Risas] Como pueden ver, no cambié mi apellido [risas]. Vivimos en Boston. Soy originaria de Pensilvania de Lancaster.

Roberto Nuñez: Yo soy Roberto Nunez. Como pueden escuchar por mi acento, soy de Méjico y estoy feliz de estar aquí en Boston con este frío.

Fisher: Roberto y Cara fueron una de las primeras personas en comunicarse conmigo cuando anunciamos Historias de Gathering. El Arnold Arboretum ocupa un lugar especial en sus corazones. Después de mucha expectación y planificación, Roberto le propuso matrimonio a Cara en el Arnold Arboretum.

Roberto: Puse el anillo en mi mochila y fuimos allí. En el primer minuto ella comienza a decir esto es muy bonito. Esto es tan agradable. Estaba como “está bien” [risas]. Ahora debo tener la fuerza para hacerlo y luego esperar hasta el último momento, pero creo que estuvimos como tres horas allí.

Cara: Sí. Estábamos deambulando.

Roberto: Eso es lo que yo…Estábamos a punto de irnos y dije: “Está bien”, tengo que hacerlo ahora.

Cara: Sí, estábamos a punto de irnos y él dijo, vamos a sentarnos en esos árboles durante unos cinco minutos. Estuve de acuerdo y subimos esta pequeña colina. Entonces, él dijo tengo un regalo para ti y yo estaba como “¿En serio?” Luego, solo abrió su mochila y sacó la caja del anillo. Era como, no, probablemente son aretes o algo así. Entonces, dije “¡Oh, no! ¡No son aretes!” [risas] y entonces, lo cerré y lo devolví porque estaba como ¿qué está pasando? Sí, fue un momento realmente especial y un día realmente hermoso.

Fisher: Varios meses después, Roberto y Cara celebraron su boda en el Arboretum. Recuerdan su momento favorito, sus votos matrimoniales.

Roberto: Los votos, creo que fueron muy, muy emotivos. Creo que ese fue mi momento favorito. La ceremonia real. Su papá organizó estos votos. Realmente hizo un trabajo increíble.

Cara: Sí, hizo una apertura, una oración. Luego, también leyó un poema del árbol de Joyce Kilmer que encontró.

Roberto: Ese poema fue muy agradable [estática].

Cara: Sí. ¿Quieres leerlo?

Roberto: Creo que tú lo leerás mejor porque está en inglés [estática].

Cara: No, voy a llorar si lo leo. ¿Puedes leerlo?

Roberto: Creo que llorarás de todos modos. Puedo leerlo. Solo perdona mi inglés. Leeré todo lo que dice.

El lugar en el que nos encontramos es especial para Robby y Cara. Robby le propuso matrimonio a Cara aquí y este lugar es un refugio para ellos. Un lugar donde pueden disfrutar del tiempo juntos en la encantadora creación de Dios. Y ahora el poema que dice: “Creo que nunca veré un poema tan hermoso como un árbol. Un árbol cuya boca hambrienta se presiona contra el dulce pecho que fluye de la tierra. Un árbol que mira a Dios todo el día y levanta sus frondosos brazos para rezar. Un árbol que en verano puede llevar un nido de petirrojos en el pelo. Sobre cuyo seno la nieve ha estado. Quien íntimamente vive con la lluvia. Los poemas son hechos por tontos como yo, pero solo Dios puede hacer un árbol”.

[Música: guitarra instrumental]

Fisher: Nuestro agradecimiento a Cara y Roberto que hablaron con nosotros y compartieron su historia. Si desea leer el poema Árboles de Joyce Kilmer, lo invitamos a buscarlo en el sitio web de la Fundación de Poesía. Esto fue producido por mí, Steven Salido Fisher, y apoyado a través del Arnold Arboretum, la Escuela de Divinidad de Harvard y las buenas personas en el Laboratorio de Medios de la Biblioteca de Lamont.

Muchas gracias. Hasta la próxima vez.

Wendy Estrada: You’d see behind there were some beautiful trees, where you’d stay there into the night.

Credits
Wendy Estrada
Steven Fisher
April 23, 2020

English

Steven Salido Fisher, host: You’re listening to Gathering Historias, an initiative of the Arnold Arboretum.

[Music: “En las andadas” by Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Wendy Estrada: You’d see behind there were some beautiful trees, where you’d stay there into the night. If you didn’t have a television on, you’d listen to the sounds of the crickets, the--that you begin to identify what’s out there.

Fisher: I’m Steven Salido Fisher and I record the diverse stories of Latina and Latino people in Greater Boston. I want to celebrate their experiences in nature and capture the spirit of our presence when it comes to the world’s environment.

In this recording we hear from Wendy who has lived throughout Latin America. Now living in Brookline with her family Wendy remembers some of her favorite sounds she experienced in her former home in Panama City.

Wendy: I lived in Panama for two years, a precious country, the--that is to say, I remember where we lived you heard frogs in the backyard. Monkeys arrived, beautiful birds.

[Jungle ambience]

No, very, very beautiful. You feel like you’re in the jungle, but very beautiful, yes.

In the bedroom of my children when the window, you’d see behind [the window] there were some beautiful trees, where you’d stay there into the night. If you didn’t have a television on, you’d listen to the sounds of the crickets, the--that you begin to identify what’s out there, that is to say, why so many [sounds]. You’d ask the local people, in this case I asked the woman who helped us with the cleaning and I said, “What are those sounds that we hear at night?” She told me, “Ah, they can be toads, they can be frogs, they can be crickets.” We really enjoyed that natural symphony.

I believe I miss that part--of what I was telling you, those sounds that truly--that is to say I remember the peace they gave me. And it makes me laugh a little because, uh, where I live now my neighbors have a dog and the dog barks.

[Sound effect: Dog barking]

And sometimes they [the neighbors] come downstairs and they say, “Hey, sorry the dog is barking,” and me, “Don’t worry about it, it’s not a big deal, it’s a dog barking,” but I know they do it because in general there are people who get bothered by barking dogs here.

And I come from a city where you hear, that is to say, [city ambience] the radio from the woman next door, the car, the honking, not one dog, but five dogs fighting, that is to say, umm, I’m built, I’m not sure if soundproof, but it doesn’t affect me because I’m used to it.

So for me to listen to precious sounds from nature in the backyard of where I used to live, it’s like--I believe it what’s I can tell you that I miss the most about where we lived. It was a symphony. That is to say we had a free symphony every night.

It was an incredible peace.

Fisher: Our thanks to Wendy who spoke with us and shared her story. This was produced by me, Steven Salido Fisher, and supported through the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, and the good people over at the Lamot Library Media Lab.

Many thanks. This is Gathering Historias.

Spanish

Steven Salido Fisher, host: Estas escuchando Gathering Historias, una iniciativa del Arnold Arboretum.

[Music: “En las andadas” by Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Wendy Estrada: Tú veías atrás había unos árboles hermosos, donde te quedabas ahí en la noche, si no tenías la televisión prendida o algo, escuchabas solo los ruidos de los grillos...Que empiezas a identificar qué es eso.

Fisher: Soy Steven Salido Fisher y busco las historias diversas de gente latina en la área de Boston. Quiero celebra sus experiencias en la naturaleza y captivar el espíritu de nuestra presencia en relación al medio ambiente.

In this recording we hear from Wendy who has lived throughout Latin America. Now living in Brookline with her family Wendy remembers some of her favorite sounds she experienced in her former home in Panama City.

Wendy: Viví dos años en Panamá, un país precioso, la-- O sea, yo me acuerdo que donde vivíamos tú escuchabas las ranas en el jardín de atrás. Llegaban monos, pájaros hermosos.

[Efecto de sonido: sonidos de la selva]

No, muy, muy bonito. Te sientes como en la selva, pero muy bonito, sí.

En la recamara de mis niños cuando la ventana, tú veías atrás había unos árboles hermosos, donde te quedabas ahí en la noche, si no tenías la televisión prendida o algo, escuchabas solo los ruidos de los grillos...Que empiezas a identificar qué es eso, o sea, porque son tantos. Tú le preguntas a la gente local, en este caso yo le preguntaba a la señora que-que nos ayudaba con la limpieza y le decía, "Es que, ¿qué son esos ruidos que escuchamos en la noche?", me dice, "Ah, pueden ser, este, sapos, pueden ser ranas, pueden ser, este, como grillos". Esa sinfonía natural lo disfrutamos muchísimo.

Extraño yo creo que esa parte de lo que te decía, esos ruidos que de verdad. O sea, yo me acuerdo de la paz que me daban.

[Efecto de sonido: Perro ladrando]

Y me da un poco risa porque, ah, en donde vivo ahora mis vecinos tienen un perro y el perro ladra y a veces ellos bajan y me dicen, "Oye, perdóname, el perro está ladrando", y yo, "No te preocupes, no-no es la gran cosa, es un perro ladrando", pero yo sé que ellos lo hacen porque en general hay gente que se molesta que ladren los perros aquí.

Yo vengo de una ciudad que-que escuchas, o sea, el-el radio de la señora de al lado, el carro, el claxon, no un perro, cinco perros peleándose, o sea, umm, estoy hecha, no sé si a prueba de ruidos, pero no me-pero no me-- ¿Cómo se llama? No-no me afecta porque estoy acostumbrada.

Entonces, para mí es oír esos ruidos tan preciosos de la naturaleza en la parte de atrás de donde yo vivía, es como- yo creo que es lo que más te puedo decir que extraño de donde vivíamos. Era una sinfonía. o sea, teníamos sinfonía gratuita todas las noches. Es una paz increíble.

Fisher: Nuestras gracias a Wendy que platico con nosotros para compartir su historia. Esto fue producido por mi, Steven Salido Fisher, y apoyado por el Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, y nuestros amigos en la Oficina de Harvard de Comunicaciones y Asuntos Públicos.

Muchisimas Gracias! Estos es Gathering Historias.

Tania Erlij: They’re a lot to see whichever way you see it, whether as a scientist or simply as an act of appreciation.

Credits
Tania Erlij
Steven Fisher
April 23, 2020

English

Steven Salido Fisher, host: Estas escuchando Gathering Historias, una iniciativa del Arnold Arboretum.

[Music: “En las andadas” by Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Tania Erlij: They’re a lot to see whichever way you see it, whether as a scientist or simply as an act of appreciation.

Fisher: I’m Steven Salido Fisher and I record the diverse stories of Latina and Latino people in Greater Boston. I want to celebrate their experiences in nature and capture the spirit of our presence when it comes to the world’s environment. In this recording we hear from Tania who volunteers at the Arnold Arboretum. She’s a field study guide and works within the Arboretum landscape to provide seasonal programming for students at Boston Public Schools.

Tania: My name is Tania Erlij. I was born in Mexico in Mexico City in the Hospital Español. In Mexico I didn’t know a lot [about nature] or have a lot of curiosity. In school we didn’t learn about the differences between trees, flowers, what grows around here, how they grow. I don’t know if they taught it, but I don’t remember any of it.

In Boston I always liked taking a stroll at the Arboretum, but it was always a place to simply be outside and I wasn’t very focused in learning about the differences [among plants] until my curiosity allowed me to see the changes of season and the leaves, and I really enjoyed it. Later I found out that there was this program to be a student guide for school children.

[Sound ambience: children playing]

Fisher: Tania has come to appreciate the curiosity of the students who come to visit.

Tania: They have a deep education and an extraordinary curiosity. And it doesn’t matter if they’re coming from school where they aren’t as prepared or they don’t know the difference between a branch, a trunk and their different functions. They’re very young, but they’re eager. They have an extraordinary curiosity. There are times when they say, “This is so beautiful! I want to live in the Arboretum.” [Laughter] They’re a lot to see whichever way you see it, whether as a scientist or simply as an act of appreciation.

When you ask them, “We’re going to see this trunk. What do you see in the trunk?” And “How does it feel?” We’re taught to learn, “We’re going to feel the texture,” because the children really enjoy everything that has to do with touch. Before you know it it’s no longer a trunk, but they’re so up close that you can see the little animals that I don’t even see. They see a spider and when they see flowers--beyond seeing the different parts of a flower with interest, they want to take flowers to share with their moms.

That happens pretty often with them. They want to take a part of the Arboretum with them. For example, whether we’re watching fruits and their seeds, “I want to take this fruit because I want to grow it!” And you can ask them, “Do you have a garden?” They don’t have a garden. But they see the earth and they want to plant the seeds from the fruit. Or they say, “This stone. I want to take this stone because my mom will like it.”

[Music: “Noia de Porcellana (Porcelain Girl)” by Pau Riba”]

Tania: The necessity to share with one’s family--I’m assuming families that work a lot with little time to go outside--because they know their families would love to go outside too.

Fisher: Our thanks to Tania who spoke with us and shared her story. This was produced by me, Steven Salido Fisher, and supported through the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, and the good people over at the Lamot Library Media Lab.

Many thanks. Until next time this is Gathering Historias.

Spanish

Steven Salido Fisher, host: Estas escuchando Gathering Historias, una iniciativa del Arnold Arboretum.

[Musica: “En las andadas” de Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Tania Erlij: Hay mucho para ver, cómo lo veas, como científica o como nada más apreciar.

Fisher: Soy Steven Salido Fisher y busco las historias diversas de gente latina en la área de Boston. Quiero celebra sus experiencias en la naturaleza y captivar el espíritu de nuestra presencia en relación al medio ambiente. En este historia escuchamos a Tania que trabaja como voluntario en el Arnold Arboretum. Ella es una guía que trabaja con estudiantes de las escuelas públicas de Boston que vienen a conocer el Arboretum.

Tania: Mi nombre es Tania Erlis. Yo nací en México, en la Ciudad de México, en el Hospital Español. En México yo no sabía tanto, no me entraba la curiosidad. En la escuela tampoco aprendíamos las diferencias entre los árboles, las flores, qué crece por acá, cómo crecen, no sé si lo enseñaban, pero no me acuerdo nada, nada de eso.

En Boston siempre me gustaba irme a pasear al Arboretum, pero era un lugar para estar afuera y no estaba tan enfocada ni interesada en conocer otra vez las diferencias, hasta que después empecé a tener más curiosidad de observarlo, de ver los cambios, las hojas y me gustó muchísimo. Después me enteré que había este programa de guías para niños en las escuelas.

[Efecto de sonido: ninos jugando]

Fisher: Tania has come to appreciate the curiosity of the students who come to visit.

Tania: Tienen una educación muy profunda y una curiosidad bárbara, y no importa si vienen de escuelas donde no están tan preparados, donde no saben la diferencia entre una ramita, el tronco o cuáles son ciertas funciones. Son muy jovencitos, pero están dispuestos, tienen una curiosidad bárbara. Hay veces que dicen, "Qué bonito es esto. Yo quiero vivir en el Arboretum." Hay mucho para ver, cómo lo veas, como científica o como nada más apreciar.

Cuando les preguntas, "Vamos a ver este tronco. ¿Qué ven en el tronco? Y, ¿cómo se sienten?" Estamos educadas a aprender, "Vamos a sentir la textura", porque a los niños les gusta mucho todo lo que es de tocar. En un momento dado ya no es el tronco, pero están tan cerquita que puedes ver animalitos que yo no veo allí, ven una araña, y cuando ven flores-- Además de tratar de ver las partes de las flores, interesarse, quieren llevarse flores para compartirlas con sus mamás.

Eso sucede mucho con ellos, que quieren llevarse algo del Arboretum, ya sea, por ejemplo, cuando estamos viendo frutas y ver las semillas adentro, "Yo me voy a llevar esta fruta porque quiero sembrarla allí" y no es que tú les preguntas, "¿Tienes jardín?" No tienen jardín, pero allí ven tierrita y quieren sembrar esa fruta. O, "Esta piedra, esta piedra le va a gustar a mi madre, quiero llevarla".

[Musica: “Noia de Porcellana (Porcelain Girl)” de Pau Riba”]

Tania: También la necesidad de poder compartir con las familias que quizás, yo asumo, que son familias que están trabajando mucho y no hay mucho tiempo para salir, que les encantaría salir también.

Fisher: Nuestras gracias a Tania que platico con nosotros para compartir su historia. Esto fue producido por mi, Steven Salido Fisher, y apoyado por el Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, y nuestros amigos en la Biblioteca Lamont.

Muchisimas Gracias! Hasta la proxima! Estos es Gathering Historias.

Hannah Lopez: Everyone called her Gran, and I considered her to be almost like my own grandma.

Credits
Hannah Lopez
Steven Fisher
April 23, 2020

English

Steven Salido Fisher, host: You’re listening to Gathering Historias, an initiative of the Arnold Arboretum.

[Music: “En las andadas” by Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Hannah Lopez: Everyone called her Gran, and I considered her to be almost like my own grandma.

Fisher: I’m Steven Salido Fisher and I record the diverse stories of Latina and Latino people in Greater Boston. I want to celebrate their experiences in nature and capture the spirit of our presence when it comes to the world’s environment.

In this story we hear from Hannah. Originally from Mexico City, today Hannah has made her home in Boston as a musician and a zero-waste gardener. In this recording, she remembers the woman in Boston who helped her become the gardener she is today.

Hannah: I say I’m, uh, an urban gardener [laughs]. It always drew my attention and I only had house plants in pots and my husband’s grandma had a large garden. She lived about two blocks away from us. She had a large garden and one time my husband told her I wanted to start a garden, but we didn’t have the space and she offered me a chance to start one at her house.

There we had a garden for about three months and I continued going to her house to water the garden because she asked to continue to take care of it and I kept returning. But eventually the moment came where they had to sell the house that same summer. They told me we had to remove everything, but I think people normally think, “Well, you remove it and throw it in the garbage,” [laughs] but I said, “You know what? I’m going to save it.”

And we bought a bunch of bins and pots and even plastic boxes. And we put all the plants there and we moved them to the window box in my apartment [laughs]. And that’s how the garden I have at my house now was born.

And this year I collected almost like 100 tomatoes. She [my husband’s grandma] cooked a tomato sauce, a sauce they was very-very her’s, that they’d only say it was her recipe. And one of her daughters had the recipe and she handed it to me and with the tomatoes from the garden. I prepared the sauce and I made it to--to the dad of my husband who was--who always said, “No, only my mom knows how to make it, no one else knows how to make it.” And I prepared it and he said, “Yes, it turned out very good, it’s very similar!” [laughs].

The grandmother of my husband, uh, she got sick and a month later she died--it was a very, very fast pancreatic cancer. Everyone called her Gran, and I considered her to be almost like my own grandma.

[Music: “Mel (Honey)” by Pau Riba]

She was also a musician, she also had a huge piano in her house. And we got along very well. We had a big connection. And every time I garden, every time I’d water it, every time I grabbed the tomatoes I remembered her because she was the one who gave me the opportunity to learn how to garden.

Fisher: Our thanks to Hannah who spoke with us and shared her story. This was produced by me, Steven Salido Fisher, and supported through the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, and the good folks over at the Office of Harvard Public Affairs and Communications.

Many thanks! Until next time this is Gathering Historias!

Spanish

Steven Salido Fisher, host: Estas escuchando Gathering Historias, una iniciativa del Arnold Arboretum.

[Musica: “En las andadas” de Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Hannah Lopez: Todos se llamaban Grand y yo la consideraba casi como mi propia abuela.

Fisher: Soy Steven Salido Fisher y busco las historias diversas de gente latina en la area de Boston. Quiero celebra sus experiencias en la naturaleza y captivar el espíritu de nuestra presencia en relación al medio ambiente. En este historia escuchamos a Hannah. Originalmente de la Ciudad de México hoy Hannah vive en Boston como música y como jardinera de cero desperdicio. En este grabacion ella recuerda la señora Boston que apoyó su deseo de ser jardinera.

Hannah: Yo digo soy, ah, jardinera urbana [ríe]. Siempre me llamó mucho la atención y yo solo tenía plantas de casa así en maceta y la abuela de mi esposo tenía un jardín muy grande, ella vivía como a dos cuadras de nosotros. Ella tenía un jardín muy grande y una vez mi esposo le dijo que yo quería empezar hacer un jardín, pero que no teníamos espacio y me ofreció ella empezar uno en su casa.

Ahí tuvimos en jardín como por tres meses y yo seguía yendo a-a su casa a seguir regando el jardín porque ella me pidió que lo siguiera cuidando y yo seguía regresando. Pero llegó el momento en que tuvieron que vender la casa ese mismo verano. A mí me dijeron que pues teníamos que quitar todo, pero yo pienso que la gente normalmente piensa, "Bueno, lo quitas y lo tiras a la basura", [ríe] pero yo dije, "¿Sabes qué? Lo voy a salvar".

Y compramos un montón de-de cubetas y macetas y hasta como cajas de plástico. Y pusimos todas las plantas ahí y las movimos a la jardinera de mi departamento [ríe]. Y así fue como nació el jardín que ahora tengo en-en la casa.

Y este año recolecté casi como 100 jitomates. Ella cocinaba una salsa de tomate, una pasta muy-muy de ella, que nada más decían que la receta de ella. Y una de sus hijas tenía la receta escrita por ella y me la pasó y con los tomates que salieron del jardín yo preparé la salsa y se la hice a-al papá de mi esposo que era el-el que siempre decía, "No, mi mamá solo la sabe hacer, nadie más la sabe hacer". Y la preparé y dice, "Sí, quedó muy buena, se parece mucho" [ríe].

La abuelita del-de mi esposo, ah, se enfermó y como al mes después murió le- a fue un cáncer pancreático muy, muy veloz. Todos se llamaban Grand y yo la consideraba casi como mi propia abuela.

[Music: “Mel (Honey)” by Pau Riba]

También era músico, tenía un piano enorme en su casa. Y nos-nos llevábamos muy bien, teníamos una conexión muy grande. Y sí, siempre que hago el jardín, siempre que lo regaba, siempre que agarraba los jitomates me-me acordaba de ella porque ella fue la que me dio la oportunidad de aprender a hacer jardinería.

Fisher: Nuestras gracias a Hannah que platico con nosotros para compartir su historia.

Our thanks to Hannah who spoke with us and shared her story. Esto fue producido por mi, Steven Salido Fisher, y apoyado por el Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, y nuestros amigos en la Oficina de Harvard de Comunicaciones y Asuntos Públicos.

Muchisimas Gracias! Hasta la proxima! Estos es Gathering Historias.

Alejita Alvaracin: That forest is very special for me. Very special.

Credits
Alejita Alvaracin
Steven Fisher
April 23, 2020

English

Steven Salido Fisher, host: You’re listening to Gathering Historias, an initiative of the Arnold Arboretum.

[Music: “En las andadas” by Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Alejita Alvaracin: That forest is-is very special for me. Very special.

Fisher: I’m Steven Salido Fisher and I record the diverse stories of Latina and Latino people in Greater Boston. I want to celebrate their experiences in nature and capture the spirit of our presence when it comes to the world’s environment.

In this recording, we hear from Alejita who believes forests and parks are a treasure for all people in a city. To understand why she remembers her father who died in her home city of Quito, Ecuador when she was a young woman.

Alejita: My dad died about 10 years ago. I was the youngest of four brothers and I only lived with my dad my whole life. When my dad died that day at the house, I felt like my dad had chosen, God, maybe he chose that moment so that I could be there with him. When he died it was tremendous for me because I was all alone. My dad left and he was my only sustenance, my support. He was my rock and the moment he left I was left with nothing. So when he died I began to go to therapy because it was very difficult.

I remember at one part of what the psychologist told me was, “Write something that you would’ve wanted to say to your dad.” She told me, “Go somewhere that gives you peace, a place where you are alone, write a letter to your dad as if he were going to read it.” I said, “Okay.”

I wrote the letter telling him everything. I cried. It was a very-very sentimental moment, very emotional. I folded the letter and I went to a--It’s a forest, called the Metropolitan Park in Quito and I entered the forest. I always went to that forest with my dad since I was a girl to walk the dogs. My dad ran. I ran. That’s to say it was something that was a part of me and part of my dad. I felt that that was something I had to do and that the place where I had to do it.

I went, I dug a hole, I placed the paper, and I closed it. And it was like--I yelled, I cried, all my tears went away, but in that moment I felt one weight less. Obviously psychologically I thought he heard it, that he read it and that was very special for me. I even remember that place because I took a photograph because it’s a place that changed my life.

So, in that forest specifically I even remember where it was, close to the tree because it has a lot of trails, but if I go one day I’ll know that it will be there.

[Music: “Daliniana Flor (Dali's Flower)” by Pau Riba]

That is to say it’s something that is very important for me. That forest is-is very special for me. Very special.

Fisher: Our thanks to Alejita who spoke with us and allowed us into an intimate moment of her life. This was produced by me, Steven Salido Fisher, and supported through the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, and the good folks over at the Lamot Library Media Lab.

Spanish

Steven Salido Fisher, host: Estas escuchando Gathering Historias, una iniciativa del Arnold Arboretum.

[Musica: “En las andadas” de Sílvia Tomàs Trio]

Alejita Alvaracin: That forest is-is very special for me. Very special.

Fisher: Soy Steven Salido Fisher y busco las historias diversas de gente latina en la área de Boston. Quiero celebra sus experiencias en la naturaleza y captivar el espíritu de nuestra presencia en relación al medio ambiente. En este historia escuchamos a Alejita que cree que los bosques y parques son tesoros para la gente de la ciudad. Para entender porque ella recuerda su papá que murió en su casa en su ciudad de origen Quito, Ecuador cuando era una mujer joven.

Alejita: Mi papá falleció como hace 10 años. Yo era la menor de cuatro hermanos y yo solo viví toda mi vida con mi papá.

Cuando mi papi falleció ese día en la casa, yo sentí como que mi papá había escogido, Dios, quizás escogió el momento para que yo esté ahí con él. Cuando él falleció fue tremendo para mí porque yo estaba sola. Mi papá se fue y era mi único sustento, mi apoyo. Él era mi piso y al momento de él irse yo me quedé sin nada. Así que cuando él falleció yo empecé a ir a terapia porque fue muy duro.

Recuerdo que una parte de la psicóloga me dijo fue, "Escribe algo que tú hayas querido decirle a tú papá". Ella me dijo, "Ándate a un lugar que a ti te de paz, un lugar donde tú estés sola, escríbele una carta a tú papá como que él la fuera a leer", le dije, "Okay".

Le escribí la carta diciéndole todo, lloré, fue muy-muy sentimental el momento, muy emotivo. Doblé la carta y yo me fui a un-- Es un bosque, que se llama El Parque Metropolitano en Quito y entré al bosque.

En ese bosque yo iba con mi papá siempre, desde niña, a pasear a los perros, mi papá corría, yo corría, o sea, era algo parte de mí y parte de mi papá. Yo sentí que eso era algo que yo tenía que hacerlo y ese era el lugar donde tenía que hacerlo.

Fui, cavé un hoyo, puse el papel y lo cerré. Y fue como-- Grité, lloré, se me fue todas las lágrimas, pero al momento de eso sentí un peso menos. Obviamente psicológicamente yo pensé que él lo escuchó, que él lo leyó y eso fue algo muy especial para mí. Ese lugar aún lo recuerdo porque me acuerdo que tomé una foto porque ese es un-un lugar que me marcó a mí en la vida.

Entonces, en ese bosque específicamente hasta recuerdo en qué lugar fue, cerca de qué árbol porque tiene muchos caminos, pero si yo voy algún día yo sé que va a estar ahí.

[Musica: “Daliniana Flor (Dali's Flower)” de Pau Riba]

O sea, eso es algo que para mí es muy importante. Ese bosque es-es muy especial para mí, muy especial.

Fisher: Nuestras gracias a Alejita que platico con nosotros para invitarnos en un momento íntimo de su vida. Esto fue producido por mi, Steven Salido Fisher, y apoyado por el Arnold Arboretum, Harvard Divinity School, y nuestros amigos en la Biblioteca Lamont.

Muchisimas Gracias! Hasta la proxima! Estos es Gathering Historias.


Production

Stephen Fisher headshot

Steven Salido Fisher holds a BA in Political Science from the University of Notre Dame and is currently a Master of Divinity candidate at Harvard Divinity School. Raised between the forest-preserves of Chicago and the parks of Mexico City, Steven’s dual roots manifest themselves in a love of color, storytelling, and the outdoors. Today Steven does what he loves by producing the Gathering Historias Initiative alongside his work as a picture book illustrator.

If you’re interested in sharing your historia contact Steven Fisher at fisher@hds.harvard.edu for more information.